Source/Disclosures
Source:

Palestine AG. J Clin Rheumatol. 2016;doi:10.1097/RHU.0000000000000424.

August 31, 2016
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Cost, prior authorization influences physicians’ treatment preferences for ocular Behçet disease

Source/Disclosures
Source:

Palestine AG. J Clin Rheumatol. 2016;doi:10.1097/RHU.0000000000000424.

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Rheumatologists and ophthalmologists’ preferences regarding treatment options for ocular Behçet disease are impacted by concerns about cost and prior authorization, according to a study.

Of 852 rheumatologists and 934 ophthalmologists who were contacted via email to complete a survey regarding choice of treatment for a patient with ocular Behçet disease, 68 rheumatologists and 64 ophthalmologists completed the survey.

Results showed 28% of rheumatologists and 11% of ophthalmologists selected methotrexate, 12% of rheumatologists and 20% of ophthalmologists selected mycophenolate mofetil and 22% of rheumatologists and 3% of ophthalmologists selected azathioprine as first-choice therapy before adjusting for cost and prior authorization. After adjusting for cost and prior authorization, 13% of rheumatologists and 3% of ophthalmologists selected methotrexate; 3% of rheumatologists and 11% of ophthalmologists selected mycophenolate mofetil; and 16% of rheumatologists and 3% of ophthalmologists selected azathioprine as first-choice therapy.

In addition, after adjusting for cost and prior authorization, the number of physicians who selected a biologic agent as first-choice therapy significantly increased (31% vs. 65% of rheumatologists; 38% vs. 63% of ophthalmologists), and the number of physicians who selected an anti-tumor necrosis factor as first-choice therapy slightly decreased (81% vs. 79% of rheumatologists; 94% vs. 93% of ophthalmologists).

While study results show the differences in first-choice therapies for patients with ocular Behçet disease between rheumatologists and ophthalmologists before and after adjusting for cost and prior authorization, researchers wrote, “In absence of [randomized controlled trials] RCTs and studies of comparative effectiveness, physicians must rely on their experience training and interpretation of less robust forms of data in the published literature.” – by Nhu Te

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.