May 28, 2020
1 min read
Save

Top in hem/onc: ‘Chemo brain,’ climate change and cancer

You've successfully added to your alerts. You will receive an email when new content is published.

Click Here to Manage Email Alerts

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Experts spoke with Healio about ongoing research on the mechanisms behind cancer-related cognitive decline, also known as “chemo brain,” and how to manage its effects. It was the top story in hematology/oncology last week.

Another top story was about the potential impact of climate change on progress toward reducing the global burden of cancer.

Read these and more top stories in hematology/oncology below:

‘Chemo brain’: An imprecise term for a complex phenomenon

The various cognitive impairments collectively known as “chemo brain” can cause anxiety, frustration and difficulty with everyday tasks for cancer survivors. Despite what the term suggests, “chemo brain” and its associated mental changes are not necessarily related only to chemotherapy. Read more.

Oncologists urged to help fight climate change as it threatens progress against cancer

Climate change is a threat to the progress made toward reducing the global burden of cancer, according to a commentary published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. Read more.

Image of climate change concept 
Climate change is a threat to the progress made toward reducing the global burden of cancer, according to a commentary published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
Source: Adobe Stock

Advanced prostate cancer incidence continued to increase after USPSTF recommendation on testing

Incidence of regional and distant-stage prostate cancer has continued to increase among men aged 50 years and older in the United States, according to results of a retrospective study published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Read more.

Regular aspirin use may reduce risk for colorectal, other digestive tract cancers

Regular use of aspirin appeared to reduce the risk for several digestive tract cancers, according to results of a meta-analysis published in Annals of Oncology. Read more.

Physical activity before, after breast cancer treatment ‘consistently associated’ with improved survival

Physical activity before and after breast cancer treatment appeared associated with significant reductions in recurrence and mortality rates among a cohort of patients with high-risk disease, according to study results published in Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Read more.