Athletic Training and Sports Health Care

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Original Research 

Time-Course of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness Evoked by Three Intensities of Lumbar Eccentric Exercise

Robert W. Pettitt, PhD, ATC, CSCS; Brian E. Udermann, PhD, FACSM; David M. Reineke, PhD; Glenn A. Wright, PhD; Rebecca A. Battista, PhD; John M. Mayer, DC, PhD; Steven Ross Murray, DA

Abstract

The time-course of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) evoked by 3 different intensities of lumbar eccentric exercise was evaluated. The purpose of the study was to determine whether intensity of eccentric exercise for the lumber extensor muscles alters the recovery of strength and symptoms associated with DOMS. Using a lumbar extensor dynamometer, 12 participants per group performed 2 sets of 25 slow, eccentric repetitions using loads at either 50%, 70%, or 90% of their 1-repetition maximum (1 RM). Across the 3 groups, torque 1 RM decrements were greatest (P < .01) at 24 and 48 hours after exercise. Moreover, pain and disability symptoms resolved for each group by 96 hours. Force decrements at 48 hours in DOMS patients are approximately one-third of that reported for experimentally induced moderate contusions. Differences in force deficits and recovery can aid clinicians in distinguishing DOMS from more serious muscular pathology

Abstract

The time-course of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) evoked by 3 different intensities of lumbar eccentric exercise was evaluated. The purpose of the study was to determine whether intensity of eccentric exercise for the lumber extensor muscles alters the recovery of strength and symptoms associated with DOMS. Using a lumbar extensor dynamometer, 12 participants per group performed 2 sets of 25 slow, eccentric repetitions using loads at either 50%, 70%, or 90% of their 1-repetition maximum (1 RM). Across the 3 groups, torque 1 RM decrements were greatest (P < .01) at 24 and 48 hours after exercise. Moreover, pain and disability symptoms resolved for each group by 96 hours. Force decrements at 48 hours in DOMS patients are approximately one-third of that reported for experimentally induced moderate contusions. Differences in force deficits and recovery can aid clinicians in distinguishing DOMS from more serious muscular pathology
Authors

Dr Pettitt is from Minnesota State University, Mankato, Mankato, Minn; Drs Udermann, Reineke, and Wright are from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, La Crosse, Wis; Dr Battista is from Appalachian State University, Boone, NC; Dr Mayer is from University of South Florida, Tampa, Fla; and Dr Murray is from Mesa State College, Grand Junction, Colo.

Originally submitted September 21, 2009.

Accepted for publication March 3, 2010.

Posted online April 28, 2010.

The authors have no financial or proprietary interest in the materials presented herein.

Address correspondence to Robert W. Pettitt, PhD, ATC, CSCS, Department of Human Performance, Highland Center 1400, Minnesota State University, Mankato, Mankato, MN 56001; e-mail: robert.pettitt@mnsu.edu.

10.3928/19425864-20100428-01

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