In the Journals

New alarm point recommended for spinal cord monitoring with TcMEP

An alarm point designated at a 70% decrease in amplitude was recommended in a recent study for routine spinal cord monitoring, particularly when used during surgery to treat spinal deformity surgery, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and extrameduallary spinal cord tumors.

In the results, which were published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, researchers prospectively analyzed transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potential (TcMEP) monitoring in 959 cases of spine deformity, spinal cord tumor and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament surgery performed between 2010 and 2012 at multiple center. They designated a 70% decrease in amplitude during TcMEP monitoring as the alarm point and prospectively analyzed TcMEP  variability and preoperative and postoperative motor deficits in the patients.

Overall, researchers found two false-negative cases, which they noted in the study abstract occurred during intramedullary spinal cord tumor surgery. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity for the new alarm criterion  when used for for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring and that it produced favorable accuracy, except in cases of intramedullary spinal cord tumor.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

An alarm point designated at a 70% decrease in amplitude was recommended in a recent study for routine spinal cord monitoring, particularly when used during surgery to treat spinal deformity surgery, ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and extrameduallary spinal cord tumors.

In the results, which were published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, researchers prospectively analyzed transcranial electrical stimulation motor evoked potential (TcMEP) monitoring in 959 cases of spine deformity, spinal cord tumor and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament surgery performed between 2010 and 2012 at multiple center. They designated a 70% decrease in amplitude during TcMEP monitoring as the alarm point and prospectively analyzed TcMEP  variability and preoperative and postoperative motor deficits in the patients.

Overall, researchers found two false-negative cases, which they noted in the study abstract occurred during intramedullary spinal cord tumor surgery. The results showed high sensitivity and specificity for the new alarm criterion  when used for for intraoperative spinal cord monitoring and that it produced favorable accuracy, except in cases of intramedullary spinal cord tumor.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.