SpinalCyte receives Chinese patent for spinal disc tissue engineering

SpinalCyte LLC, a Texas-based tissue engineering company, recently announced it received a Chinese patent entitled, “Method of differentiating human dermal fibroblasts into chondrocyte-like cells using mechanical strain.”

The patent describes technology that incorporates a 3-D matrix to expose fibroblasts to a mechanical strain using intermittent hydrostatic pressure and/or fluid shear stress. The patent also provides other claims for exposing the cells to hypoxia, growth factors and ascorbic acid, according to a company press release.

“The issuance of this patent is a major step forward in our international validation for the SpinalCyte technology. This is a significant milestone for us and we are pleased the Chinese Patent Office has validated the uniqueness of our technology which includes 10 U.S. and foreign patents issued and directly owned by the company, along with 34 patents pending,” Pete O’Heeron, chief executive office for SpinalCyte, said in the press release. “We feel the future for spinal disc regeneration will be a cell-based therapy solution and we continue to build our intellectual property to protect our leading position in this field.”

 

Reference:

www.spinalcyte.com

SpinalCyte LLC, a Texas-based tissue engineering company, recently announced it received a Chinese patent entitled, “Method of differentiating human dermal fibroblasts into chondrocyte-like cells using mechanical strain.”

The patent describes technology that incorporates a 3-D matrix to expose fibroblasts to a mechanical strain using intermittent hydrostatic pressure and/or fluid shear stress. The patent also provides other claims for exposing the cells to hypoxia, growth factors and ascorbic acid, according to a company press release.

“The issuance of this patent is a major step forward in our international validation for the SpinalCyte technology. This is a significant milestone for us and we are pleased the Chinese Patent Office has validated the uniqueness of our technology which includes 10 U.S. and foreign patents issued and directly owned by the company, along with 34 patents pending,” Pete O’Heeron, chief executive office for SpinalCyte, said in the press release. “We feel the future for spinal disc regeneration will be a cell-based therapy solution and we continue to build our intellectual property to protect our leading position in this field.”

 

Reference:

www.spinalcyte.com