In the Journals

Pediatric patients with intramedullary spinal cord tumors show good prognosis

The prognosis for patients with pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors is positive, with long-term outcomes and sustained functional improvement expected at long-term follow-up, according to study results.

Researchers analyzed case records for pediatric patients aged younger than 21 years who underwent surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) between 1975 and 2010. A total of 55 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up was 11.4 years. Data on long-term clinical and treatment determinants that affected disease survival and neurological outcomes were reported.

The most common tumor subgroup was Astrocytomas, which appeared in 53% of the patients. Of the 55 patients analyzed, 21 achieved Gross-total resection.

At follow-up, 30 patients demonstrated neurological improvement, whereas 17 exhibited neurological decline. The remaining eight patients were neurologically stable at follow-up.

Patients with McCormick grade I showed more functional improvement at follow-up than those with grades II to V, according to the researchers.

At 5-, 10- and 20-year follow-up, progression-free survival rates were 61%, 54% and 44%, respectively. Overall survival rates were 85%, 75% and 64%, respectively, at the same follow-up points, the researchers found.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

The prognosis for patients with pediatric intramedullary spinal cord tumors is positive, with long-term outcomes and sustained functional improvement expected at long-term follow-up, according to study results.

Researchers analyzed case records for pediatric patients aged younger than 21 years who underwent surgery for intramedullary spinal cord tumors (IMSCTs) between 1975 and 2010. A total of 55 patients were included in the study. Mean follow-up was 11.4 years. Data on long-term clinical and treatment determinants that affected disease survival and neurological outcomes were reported.

The most common tumor subgroup was Astrocytomas, which appeared in 53% of the patients. Of the 55 patients analyzed, 21 achieved Gross-total resection.

At follow-up, 30 patients demonstrated neurological improvement, whereas 17 exhibited neurological decline. The remaining eight patients were neurologically stable at follow-up.

Patients with McCormick grade I showed more functional improvement at follow-up than those with grades II to V, according to the researchers.

At 5-, 10- and 20-year follow-up, progression-free survival rates were 61%, 54% and 44%, respectively. Overall survival rates were 85%, 75% and 64%, respectively, at the same follow-up points, the researchers found.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.