In the Journals

Researchers identify nationwide complication, mortality rate after IM spinal cord tumor resection

Researchers in this study analyzed the complications and mortality after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection and found that factors such as age, race, gender, insurance, and comorbidities influenced the complication rate and cost of the procedure, according to data published recently in The Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

 

“Elderly age group, lower median household income, non-private insurance, a higher comorbidity index, presence of complications, larger hospital size, Northeast region, and weekend and non-elective admissions were the independent predictors of adverse discharge disposition,” Mayur Sharma, MD, MCh, and colleagues wrote in their study.

They added, “Young age group, higher median household income, non-private insurance, presence of complications, a higher comorbidity index, high-volume and larger-size hospitals, West region, teaching hospitals, and weekend and non-elective admissions were the predictors of higher cost incurred at the hospitals.”

Sharma and colleagues used the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to analyze 15,545 admissions between 2003 and 2010. During this time, the mortality rate was 0.46% and the discharge rate was 64.1%. Overall, the mean charges for hospitalization were $45,452.24 in 2003 and $76,698.96 in 2010, according to the abstract. – by Jeff Craven

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Researchers in this study analyzed the complications and mortality after intramedullary spinal cord tumor resection and found that factors such as age, race, gender, insurance, and comorbidities influenced the complication rate and cost of the procedure, according to data published recently in The Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine.

 

“Elderly age group, lower median household income, non-private insurance, a higher comorbidity index, presence of complications, larger hospital size, Northeast region, and weekend and non-elective admissions were the independent predictors of adverse discharge disposition,” Mayur Sharma, MD, MCh, and colleagues wrote in their study.

They added, “Young age group, higher median household income, non-private insurance, presence of complications, a higher comorbidity index, high-volume and larger-size hospitals, West region, teaching hospitals, and weekend and non-elective admissions were the predictors of higher cost incurred at the hospitals.”

Sharma and colleagues used the U.S. Nationwide Inpatient Sample database to analyze 15,545 admissions between 2003 and 2010. During this time, the mortality rate was 0.46% and the discharge rate was 64.1%. Overall, the mean charges for hospitalization were $45,452.24 in 2003 and $76,698.96 in 2010, according to the abstract. – by Jeff Craven

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.