Meeting News Coverage

Speaker: Perform post-resection follow-up of primary spinal osteochondroma

LYON, France — The long-term clinical outcomes of patients with spinal osteochondroma who were included in a multicenter, ambispective AOSpine International study showed most of the patients underwent en bloc resection and received Enneking appropriate treatment.

These tumors, though benign, still require fastidious follow-up by physicians, Zsolt Szövérfi, MD, said during his presentation at the EuroSpine Annual Meeting, here. He said many of the 27 patients studied had primary osteochondromas classified as Stage 1.

Szövérfi said the take home message of his group’s study, which included patients treated at centers in North America, Europe and Asia, was that “Osteochondroma still require surgical management and thorough follow-up.”

The average patient age was 37 years when they were diagnosed with spinal osteochondromas, a condition that mostly involves the posterior spinal elements. Severe pain was the main indication for surgery, Szövérfi, who is at the National Center for Spinal Disorders in Budapest, said.

“We had two local recurrences,” he said and they were both in the group that required one-level resection, “which is odd.”

Both patients with a recurrence of osteochondroma were treated at S1, according to the study abstract, and overall survivorship in the study was 85%.

Although four patients who participated in the study died, their deaths were unrelated to their osteochondromas, according to Szövérfi.

When session moderator Antonio Faundez, MD, of Geneva, asked about when and how to follow up these patients, Szövérfi said it should be done at 6 months after tumor resection and every year thereafter. He also recommended obtaining radiographs and CT images at each follow-up examination. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Varga P. Paper #26. Presented at: EuroSpine Annual Meeting; Oct. 1-3, 2014; Lyon, France.

Disclosure: Spine Surgery Today was unable to determine whether Szövérfi has any relevant financial disclosures.

LYON, France — The long-term clinical outcomes of patients with spinal osteochondroma who were included in a multicenter, ambispective AOSpine International study showed most of the patients underwent en bloc resection and received Enneking appropriate treatment.

These tumors, though benign, still require fastidious follow-up by physicians, Zsolt Szövérfi, MD, said during his presentation at the EuroSpine Annual Meeting, here. He said many of the 27 patients studied had primary osteochondromas classified as Stage 1.

Szövérfi said the take home message of his group’s study, which included patients treated at centers in North America, Europe and Asia, was that “Osteochondroma still require surgical management and thorough follow-up.”

The average patient age was 37 years when they were diagnosed with spinal osteochondromas, a condition that mostly involves the posterior spinal elements. Severe pain was the main indication for surgery, Szövérfi, who is at the National Center for Spinal Disorders in Budapest, said.

“We had two local recurrences,” he said and they were both in the group that required one-level resection, “which is odd.”

Both patients with a recurrence of osteochondroma were treated at S1, according to the study abstract, and overall survivorship in the study was 85%.

Although four patients who participated in the study died, their deaths were unrelated to their osteochondromas, according to Szövérfi.

When session moderator Antonio Faundez, MD, of Geneva, asked about when and how to follow up these patients, Szövérfi said it should be done at 6 months after tumor resection and every year thereafter. He also recommended obtaining radiographs and CT images at each follow-up examination. – by Susan M. Rapp

Reference:

Varga P. Paper #26. Presented at: EuroSpine Annual Meeting; Oct. 1-3, 2014; Lyon, France.

Disclosure: Spine Surgery Today was unable to determine whether Szövérfi has any relevant financial disclosures.

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