In the Journals

New tool can help estimate patients’ mean sagittal deformity risk

Spinal deformity following surgery for intramedullary tumors can be a serious complication, and researchers have developed a statistical tool that may help predict postoperative sagittal deformity risk.

Researchers conducted a retrospective study of 63 patients with an intramedullary tumor who underwent surgery between 1985 and 2011. Patients’ mean sagittal deformity was 15.9°, with a range of 0° to 77°. Mean follow-up was 85.4 months. The study’s primary outcome measure was the difference between pre- and postoperative Cobb angle measures as formed by the superior and inferior limits of the laminectomy at final follow-up.

Through a univariate analysis, the researchers found age of 30 years or younger, undergoing a laminectomy of four levels or greater, and undergoing a laminectomy that included a spinal junction to be independent predictive factors. Upon multivariate analysis, however, only age and the number of spinal levels involved in the laminectomy were found to be significant, independent predictive factors of postoperative sagittal deformity, according to the researchers.

From their findings, the researchers were able to develop a linear regression equation that can quantitatively predict sagittal deformity for any follow-up time point after surgery.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures. 

Spinal deformity following surgery for intramedullary tumors can be a serious complication, and researchers have developed a statistical tool that may help predict postoperative sagittal deformity risk.

Researchers conducted a retrospective study of 63 patients with an intramedullary tumor who underwent surgery between 1985 and 2011. Patients’ mean sagittal deformity was 15.9°, with a range of 0° to 77°. Mean follow-up was 85.4 months. The study’s primary outcome measure was the difference between pre- and postoperative Cobb angle measures as formed by the superior and inferior limits of the laminectomy at final follow-up.

Through a univariate analysis, the researchers found age of 30 years or younger, undergoing a laminectomy of four levels or greater, and undergoing a laminectomy that included a spinal junction to be independent predictive factors. Upon multivariate analysis, however, only age and the number of spinal levels involved in the laminectomy were found to be significant, independent predictive factors of postoperative sagittal deformity, according to the researchers.

From their findings, the researchers were able to develop a linear regression equation that can quantitatively predict sagittal deformity for any follow-up time point after surgery.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.