Computer-guided spinal surgery may be the future for treatment

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have used a new method of computer-guided spine surgery system for spinal reconstruction and to treat complex tumors and degenerative spine problems. According to a press release, a recent study they conducted showed this system resulted in fewer complications and better outcomes for patients.

“Computer-guided surgical navigation technology delivers on quality and safety,” J. Patrick Johnson, MD, a neurosurgery spine specialist and director of spine education and the neurosurgery spine fellowship program at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery, stated in the press release. “It clearly improves outcomes in spine care.”

According to the release, the new spine navigation technique uses high-speed CT imaging to navigate in and around the spinal column from different angles. The method can reduce or avoid complications, postoperative pain and the need for follow-up surgery.

The method uses a mobile CT scanner to take cross-sectional images of the spine while a patient is in surgery. The images are then transferred to a computer and are displayed on overhead monitors for surgeons to precisely track their instruments. This can be done while surgeons insert screws for reconstruction and perform other spine procedures, according to the press release.

“This approach represents a major leap forward for instrumented spine surgery,” Terrence T. Kim, MD, an orthopedic spine surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Spine Center and an expert in the computer-guided navigation field, stated. “We’re looking at the future.”

Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center have used a new method of computer-guided spine surgery system for spinal reconstruction and to treat complex tumors and degenerative spine problems. According to a press release, a recent study they conducted showed this system resulted in fewer complications and better outcomes for patients.

“Computer-guided surgical navigation technology delivers on quality and safety,” J. Patrick Johnson, MD, a neurosurgery spine specialist and director of spine education and the neurosurgery spine fellowship program at the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery, stated in the press release. “It clearly improves outcomes in spine care.”

According to the release, the new spine navigation technique uses high-speed CT imaging to navigate in and around the spinal column from different angles. The method can reduce or avoid complications, postoperative pain and the need for follow-up surgery.

The method uses a mobile CT scanner to take cross-sectional images of the spine while a patient is in surgery. The images are then transferred to a computer and are displayed on overhead monitors for surgeons to precisely track their instruments. This can be done while surgeons insert screws for reconstruction and perform other spine procedures, according to the press release.

“This approach represents a major leap forward for instrumented spine surgery,” Terrence T. Kim, MD, an orthopedic spine surgeon at Cedars-Sinai Spine Center and an expert in the computer-guided navigation field, stated. “We’re looking at the future.”