In the Journals

Surgical intervention for arachnoiditis ossificans may lead to poor outcomes

According to findings from a recently published case study, arachnoiditis ossificans is a relatively rare disorder with unclear etiologies that may not be able to be addressed through surgical intervention.

Researchers noted the case of a 29-year-old male patient who reported lower back stiffness and discomfort 23 months after undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation and fusion for multiple lumbar spine fractures. The patient underwent a laminectomy at L2 and L3-4. Allogeneic bone was used to perform posterolateral fusion, and the surgeons noted at L2, bone fragments from the burst fracture had injured the dural sac along with some nerve roots.

Using MRI and CT, the researchers diagnosed the patient with arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) of the thecal sac from L1-5. The patient regained motor and sensory functions postoperatively, and his neurological status progressively improved. As a result of the improvement, his fixation hardware was removed without further decompression, according to the researchers.

The researchers concluded surgical intervention for the treatment of AO should be considered carefully, as the outcomes cannot be predicted and may lead to multiple revision surgeries. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

According to findings from a recently published case study, arachnoiditis ossificans is a relatively rare disorder with unclear etiologies that may not be able to be addressed through surgical intervention.

Researchers noted the case of a 29-year-old male patient who reported lower back stiffness and discomfort 23 months after undergoing posterior pedicle screw fixation and fusion for multiple lumbar spine fractures. The patient underwent a laminectomy at L2 and L3-4. Allogeneic bone was used to perform posterolateral fusion, and the surgeons noted at L2, bone fragments from the burst fracture had injured the dural sac along with some nerve roots.

Using MRI and CT, the researchers diagnosed the patient with arachnoiditis ossificans (AO) of the thecal sac from L1-5. The patient regained motor and sensory functions postoperatively, and his neurological status progressively improved. As a result of the improvement, his fixation hardware was removed without further decompression, according to the researchers.

The researchers concluded surgical intervention for the treatment of AO should be considered carefully, as the outcomes cannot be predicted and may lead to multiple revision surgeries. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.