In the Journals

Facet effusion sign should not deter decompression for spondylolisthesis

According to results in a recently published study, effusion alone may not be an indication for adding fusion to decompression in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Researchers analyzed the differences between decompression alone and decompression with fusion in the presence or absence of the facet effusion sign in 160 patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) identified from the Spine Center Registry.

Forty-four patients had effusion and underwent decompression, 76 patients had effusion and underwent decompression and fusion, 19 patients had no effusion and underwent decompression, and 21 patients had no effusion and underwent both decompression and fusion. Patients completed the Multidimensional Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) preoperatively and again at 3, 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The patients were also questions regarding their global outcomes of surgery and whether they underwent any reoperations at either the same or a different area of the spine.

Results showed a significant improvement in pain and multidimensional outcomes 2 years after treatment in all groups (P < .05). Additionally, when controlling for age and sex, the presence of the facet effusion sign and/or the type of treatment received had no significantly different effect on outcomes, according to the researchers. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

According to results in a recently published study, effusion alone may not be an indication for adding fusion to decompression in the treatment of lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis.

Researchers analyzed the differences between decompression alone and decompression with fusion in the presence or absence of the facet effusion sign in 160 patients with lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis (LDS) identified from the Spine Center Registry.

Forty-four patients had effusion and underwent decompression, 76 patients had effusion and underwent decompression and fusion, 19 patients had no effusion and underwent decompression, and 21 patients had no effusion and underwent both decompression and fusion. Patients completed the Multidimensional Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) preoperatively and again at 3, 12 and 24 months postoperatively. The patients were also questions regarding their global outcomes of surgery and whether they underwent any reoperations at either the same or a different area of the spine.

Results showed a significant improvement in pain and multidimensional outcomes 2 years after treatment in all groups (P < .05). Additionally, when controlling for age and sex, the presence of the facet effusion sign and/or the type of treatment received had no significantly different effect on outcomes, according to the researchers. – by Robert Linnehan

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.