Meeting News Coverage

Intrawound vancomycin powder can reduce risk of SSI after posterior spine surgery

ORLANDO, Fla. — Patients who underwent elective spine surgery and received intrawound vancomycin powder experienced reduced risks of surgical site infection and return to the OR due to infection, according to the results of a study presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

A multivariable regression analysis showed that, outside of intrawound vancomycin powder, an increased number of levels exposed during surgery and postoperative ICU admission were risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and return to the OR for infection. Increased BMI and diabetes were not associated with these risks, Elliot Kim, MD, said at the meeting.

“Intrawound application of vancomycin in posterior spine surgery was associated with reduced overall infection and infection requiring a return to the operating room,” he said.  

The multicenter study included 2,311 patients, with 45% of patients receiving intrawound vancomycin powder. The prevalence of SSI in patients who did not receive vancomycin was 5.1% compared with 2.4% for patients received intrawound vancomycin, Kim said.

The reduction in SSI with intrawound vancomycin was statistically significant compared with patients who did not receive the treatment, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference: Devin CJ, et al. Paper #728. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 1-5, 2016; Orlando, Fla.

 

Disclosure: Kim reports no relevant financial disclosures. 

ORLANDO, Fla. — Patients who underwent elective spine surgery and received intrawound vancomycin powder experienced reduced risks of surgical site infection and return to the OR due to infection, according to the results of a study presented at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting.

A multivariable regression analysis showed that, outside of intrawound vancomycin powder, an increased number of levels exposed during surgery and postoperative ICU admission were risk factors for surgical site infection (SSI) and return to the OR for infection. Increased BMI and diabetes were not associated with these risks, Elliot Kim, MD, said at the meeting.

“Intrawound application of vancomycin in posterior spine surgery was associated with reduced overall infection and infection requiring a return to the operating room,” he said.  

The multicenter study included 2,311 patients, with 45% of patients receiving intrawound vancomycin powder. The prevalence of SSI in patients who did not receive vancomycin was 5.1% compared with 2.4% for patients received intrawound vancomycin, Kim said.

The reduction in SSI with intrawound vancomycin was statistically significant compared with patients who did not receive the treatment, he said. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Reference: Devin CJ, et al. Paper #728. Presented at: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Annual Meeting; March 1-5, 2016; Orlando, Fla.

 

Disclosure: Kim reports no relevant financial disclosures. 

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