Meeting News Coverage

In vitro study shows effect of vancomycin powder on dural healing

ORLANDO, Fla. — Fusiform cells from cultured dural tissue lost all their organizational patterns when vancomycin powder was added to them, according to the results of an in vitro study presented at Spine Summit 2016: CNS/AANS Section on Disorders of the Spine & Peripheral Nerves Annual Meeting.

The investigators noted the findings underscore the need for better studies into the full impact that dosing and timing of vancomycin powder has on human tissues. Ezequiel Goldschmidt, MD, PhD, a resident in neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh, presented the findings. Goldschmidt and colleagues developed the in vitro model to study whether vancomycin powder affected dural repair, as well as osteoblast formation.

“We know that when vancomycin powder is applied locally the cells are exposed to a concentration that is several times that [of] when the vancomycin is delivered systemically,” he said.

The researchers also learned more about the timing of the effect of vancomycin powder from their in vitro model. They found fewer cells were viable after vancomycin powder was added in one of their cultured samples. In another case, when the highest amount of vancomycin powder used in the study was applied, all the cells were dead by day 1, Goldschmidt noted.

“In this in vitro model, vancomycin induced dural cell death, inhibited the growth and altered the cellular morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion. Therefore, maybe defining a safe vancomycin concentration that is both bactericidal and also not does inhibit dural healing is necessary,” Goldschmidt said.

At the outset, the researchers ascertained all the dural tissue samples they used and cultured had successfully developed into fusiform cells with classic projections and spindle formation. They then determined the cell count for control samples, as well as those samples to which three different doses of vancomycin powder were added.

According to the abstract, Goldschmidt and colleagues observed that vancomycin-exposed cells histologically demonstrated a cytoplasm that was smaller and showed decreased pseudopodia formation. by Susan M. Rapp

 

For more information:

Goldschmidt E, et al. Paper #104. Presented at: Spine Summit 2016: CNS/AANS Section on Disorders of the Spine & Peripheral Nerves Annual Meeting; March 16-19, 2016; Orlando, Fla.

 

Disclosure: Goldschmidt reports no relevant financial disclosures.

ORLANDO, Fla. — Fusiform cells from cultured dural tissue lost all their organizational patterns when vancomycin powder was added to them, according to the results of an in vitro study presented at Spine Summit 2016: CNS/AANS Section on Disorders of the Spine & Peripheral Nerves Annual Meeting.

The investigators noted the findings underscore the need for better studies into the full impact that dosing and timing of vancomycin powder has on human tissues. Ezequiel Goldschmidt, MD, PhD, a resident in neurological surgery at the University of Pittsburgh, presented the findings. Goldschmidt and colleagues developed the in vitro model to study whether vancomycin powder affected dural repair, as well as osteoblast formation.

“We know that when vancomycin powder is applied locally the cells are exposed to a concentration that is several times that [of] when the vancomycin is delivered systemically,” he said.

The researchers also learned more about the timing of the effect of vancomycin powder from their in vitro model. They found fewer cells were viable after vancomycin powder was added in one of their cultured samples. In another case, when the highest amount of vancomycin powder used in the study was applied, all the cells were dead by day 1, Goldschmidt noted.

“In this in vitro model, vancomycin induced dural cell death, inhibited the growth and altered the cellular morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion. Therefore, maybe defining a safe vancomycin concentration that is both bactericidal and also not does inhibit dural healing is necessary,” Goldschmidt said.

At the outset, the researchers ascertained all the dural tissue samples they used and cultured had successfully developed into fusiform cells with classic projections and spindle formation. They then determined the cell count for control samples, as well as those samples to which three different doses of vancomycin powder were added.

According to the abstract, Goldschmidt and colleagues observed that vancomycin-exposed cells histologically demonstrated a cytoplasm that was smaller and showed decreased pseudopodia formation. by Susan M. Rapp

 

For more information:

Goldschmidt E, et al. Paper #104. Presented at: Spine Summit 2016: CNS/AANS Section on Disorders of the Spine & Peripheral Nerves Annual Meeting; March 16-19, 2016; Orlando, Fla.

 

Disclosure: Goldschmidt reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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