SpinalCyte announces results from study on spinal disc height improvement

SpinalCyte LLC announced preliminary results for its phase II animal study on spinal disc height improvement.

According to a company press release, Howard An, MD, director of Division of Spine Surgery and the Spine Fellowship Program at Rush University Medical Center, and his team studied 48 rabbits. Of these rabbits, 16 received saline, 16 received human dermal fibroblasts and 16 received rabbit dermal fibroblasts.

Investigators injured subjects to reduce disc height to 75% of normal height and noted human dermal fibroblasts-treated discs had a greater improvement in disc height indexes compared with rabbit dermal fibroblasts, with the human dermal fibroblast group gaining 81% of disc height compared with 77% in the rabbit dermal fibroblast group.

“This positive report is exactly what we have been waiting for,” Pete O’Heeron, chief executive officer for SpinalCyte, said in the release. “We are still looking forward to the biochemistry and biochemical reports to further support Dr. An’s findings, but this is such a major step forward in the scientific validation of our cell-based therapy approach.”

 

Reference:

 

www.spinalcyte.com

SpinalCyte LLC announced preliminary results for its phase II animal study on spinal disc height improvement.

According to a company press release, Howard An, MD, director of Division of Spine Surgery and the Spine Fellowship Program at Rush University Medical Center, and his team studied 48 rabbits. Of these rabbits, 16 received saline, 16 received human dermal fibroblasts and 16 received rabbit dermal fibroblasts.

Investigators injured subjects to reduce disc height to 75% of normal height and noted human dermal fibroblasts-treated discs had a greater improvement in disc height indexes compared with rabbit dermal fibroblasts, with the human dermal fibroblast group gaining 81% of disc height compared with 77% in the rabbit dermal fibroblast group.

“This positive report is exactly what we have been waiting for,” Pete O’Heeron, chief executive officer for SpinalCyte, said in the release. “We are still looking forward to the biochemistry and biochemical reports to further support Dr. An’s findings, but this is such a major step forward in the scientific validation of our cell-based therapy approach.”

 

Reference:

 

www.spinalcyte.com