Survey reveals majority of adults do not recognize common concussion symptoms

A recent survey of 1,000 adults in the United States, conducted by KRC Research in partnership with Abbott, revealed 80% of adults cannot identify the most common concussion symptoms.

The data also suggest adults are five times more likely to seek medical attention for a possible broken bone, compared with a possible concussion.

According to the survey results, more than 80% of adults believe someone who has sustained a concussion should not sleep or should be woken up periodically after the diagnosis.

The common signs of concussion vary, but may include dizziness, blurred vision, balance problems, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and increased anxiety or irritability. However, there is no way to perfectly diagnose a concussion and many tend to go unrecognized, according to a company press release.

Abbot is partnering with the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a blood test capable of evaluating potential concussions. The test will be designed to be used on Abbott’s i-STAT, a handheld analyzer used to perform several blood tests, according to company representatives.

Reference: www.abbott.com

A recent survey of 1,000 adults in the United States, conducted by KRC Research in partnership with Abbott, revealed 80% of adults cannot identify the most common concussion symptoms.

The data also suggest adults are five times more likely to seek medical attention for a possible broken bone, compared with a possible concussion.

According to the survey results, more than 80% of adults believe someone who has sustained a concussion should not sleep or should be woken up periodically after the diagnosis.

The common signs of concussion vary, but may include dizziness, blurred vision, balance problems, nausea, vomiting, fatigue and increased anxiety or irritability. However, there is no way to perfectly diagnose a concussion and many tend to go unrecognized, according to a company press release.

Abbot is partnering with the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a blood test capable of evaluating potential concussions. The test will be designed to be used on Abbott’s i-STAT, a handheld analyzer used to perform several blood tests, according to company representatives.

Reference: www.abbott.com