In the Journals

Findings support growing belief of no link between concussion history and neurocognitive performance

In a recent study, researchers found no connection between the concussive history of an NFL draft pick and how they performed on two types of neurocognitive tests -- the Wonderlic and the imPACT tests.

“Concussion history was not related to performance on either Wonderlic or ImPACT, suggesting that for this cohort (and at this point in time), a history of concussion may not have adverse effects on neurocognitive functioning, as assessed by these instruments. Our results add to the growing body of literature suggesting that there is no relationship between concussion history and neurocognitive functioning in potential draft picks entering the NFL or in active NFL players,” Gary S. Solomon, PhD, at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues wrote in the study.

Over a span of 7 years, 266 athletes were invited to attend an NFL team’s headquarters after the combine and they were divided into three groups: athletes that had suffered zero concussions in their career, one concussion in their career, or two and more concussions in their career.

After Solomon and colleagues compared scores on both the Wonderlic and imPACT tests for all three groups they found the athletes’ concussive history had no effect on the outcomes of those tests.

Solomon and colleagues concluded for “elite NFL draft picks” concussive history did not affect their performance on either of the neurocognitive tests.

“The results obtained in this study indicate that prior concussions do not affect neurocognitive functioning adversely in this cohort, supporting the growing literature attesting to no relationship between concussion history and neurocognitive performance in active American professional football players,” Solomon and colleagues wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Disclosures: Gary S. Solomon reports that he is a member of the professional Advisory Board of ImPACT and is reimbursed for expenses to board meetings.

In a recent study, researchers found no connection between the concussive history of an NFL draft pick and how they performed on two types of neurocognitive tests -- the Wonderlic and the imPACT tests.

“Concussion history was not related to performance on either Wonderlic or ImPACT, suggesting that for this cohort (and at this point in time), a history of concussion may not have adverse effects on neurocognitive functioning, as assessed by these instruments. Our results add to the growing body of literature suggesting that there is no relationship between concussion history and neurocognitive functioning in potential draft picks entering the NFL or in active NFL players,” Gary S. Solomon, PhD, at Vanderbilt University, in Nashville, Tenn., and colleagues wrote in the study.

Over a span of 7 years, 266 athletes were invited to attend an NFL team’s headquarters after the combine and they were divided into three groups: athletes that had suffered zero concussions in their career, one concussion in their career, or two and more concussions in their career.

After Solomon and colleagues compared scores on both the Wonderlic and imPACT tests for all three groups they found the athletes’ concussive history had no effect on the outcomes of those tests.

Solomon and colleagues concluded for “elite NFL draft picks” concussive history did not affect their performance on either of the neurocognitive tests.

“The results obtained in this study indicate that prior concussions do not affect neurocognitive functioning adversely in this cohort, supporting the growing literature attesting to no relationship between concussion history and neurocognitive performance in active American professional football players,” Solomon and colleagues wrote. – by Robert Linnehan

 

Disclosures: Gary S. Solomon reports that he is a member of the professional Advisory Board of ImPACT and is reimbursed for expenses to board meetings.