In the Journals

Arab adults share similar coccyx traits with individuals of other ethnicities

Researchers have found that Arab adults share some similarities and differences with people of other ethnicities with regard to coccygeal morphology and morphometry.

Yousef Abbas Marwan, BMedSc, BMBCh, and colleagues reviewed 202 CT scans of adult Arabs. They recorded sacrococcygeal morphological features and took morphometric measurements including the length and angles of the sacrococcygeal region.

According to the results, three coccygeal segments were present in 138 individuals, with a majority of the individuals displaying coccyx type I. Seventy individuals had type II, and 31 had type III.

Joint fusion was found in 38.6% of the individuals studied; joint subluxation was found in 31.7%, coccygeal sacralization was found in 34.2%, ventral angulation of S5 was found in 38.1% and lateral deviation of the coccygeal tip was found in 38.5%.

Men were found to have longer and straighter coccyges and sacrums than women, according to the researchers.

The majority of individuals studied could potentially be at risk of developing pain in the sacrococcygeal region, Marwan and colleagues concluded.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.

Researchers have found that Arab adults share some similarities and differences with people of other ethnicities with regard to coccygeal morphology and morphometry.

Yousef Abbas Marwan, BMedSc, BMBCh, and colleagues reviewed 202 CT scans of adult Arabs. They recorded sacrococcygeal morphological features and took morphometric measurements including the length and angles of the sacrococcygeal region.

According to the results, three coccygeal segments were present in 138 individuals, with a majority of the individuals displaying coccyx type I. Seventy individuals had type II, and 31 had type III.

Joint fusion was found in 38.6% of the individuals studied; joint subluxation was found in 31.7%, coccygeal sacralization was found in 34.2%, ventral angulation of S5 was found in 38.1% and lateral deviation of the coccygeal tip was found in 38.5%.

Men were found to have longer and straighter coccyges and sacrums than women, according to the researchers.

The majority of individuals studied could potentially be at risk of developing pain in the sacrococcygeal region, Marwan and colleagues concluded.

Disclosure: The authors have no relevant financial disclosures.