In the JournalsFrom OT Europe

Laminoplasty may be beneficial for elderly patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy

Results from this study showed elderly patients who underwent laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy had recovery levels similar to those of other age groups, indicating the surgery is beneficial for elderly patients.

Researchers prospectively evaluated 505 patients who underwent modified double-door laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Patients had an average postoperative follow-up of 26.5 months. Investigators categorized patients into the following groups based on age: nonelderly (younger than 65 years), young-old (65 years to 74 years) and old-old (75 years and older). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) cervical myelopathy scoring system, the 10-second grip and release test and the 10-second step test were used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative status.

Findings showed no significant differences between the age groups with regard to JOA scores. The mean JOA score was 3.1 for non-elderly patients, 3.2 for young-old patients and 3 for old-old patients. Investigators noted the mean preoperative results for the 10-second grip and release test for nonelderly patients, young-old patients and old-old patients were 17.2, 14.4 and 13, respectively. This finding demonstrated an inverse relationship between age and scores; however, investigators noted postoperative results improved significantly in all groups with scores of 21, 17.9 and 16.3, respectively.

According to researchers, the preoperative 10-second step test scores also decreased with increasing age and improved significantly postoperatively. The postoperative complication rates were not significantly different between the age groups. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

Results from this study showed elderly patients who underwent laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy had recovery levels similar to those of other age groups, indicating the surgery is beneficial for elderly patients.

Researchers prospectively evaluated 505 patients who underwent modified double-door laminoplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Patients had an average postoperative follow-up of 26.5 months. Investigators categorized patients into the following groups based on age: nonelderly (younger than 65 years), young-old (65 years to 74 years) and old-old (75 years and older). The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) cervical myelopathy scoring system, the 10-second grip and release test and the 10-second step test were used to evaluate preoperative and postoperative status.

Findings showed no significant differences between the age groups with regard to JOA scores. The mean JOA score was 3.1 for non-elderly patients, 3.2 for young-old patients and 3 for old-old patients. Investigators noted the mean preoperative results for the 10-second grip and release test for nonelderly patients, young-old patients and old-old patients were 17.2, 14.4 and 13, respectively. This finding demonstrated an inverse relationship between age and scores; however, investigators noted postoperative results improved significantly in all groups with scores of 21, 17.9 and 16.3, respectively.

According to researchers, the preoperative 10-second step test scores also decreased with increasing age and improved significantly postoperatively. The postoperative complication rates were not significantly different between the age groups. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.