In the Journals

Biomarker may be used to predict neurological impairment in patients with CSM

Results from this study indicated diffusion spectrum basis imaging-quantified axonal loss could serve as an imaging biomarker for the prediction of functional recovery in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who undergo decompression.

Researchers prospectively enrolled patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Of these, seven patients had mild CSM; five patients had moderate CSM; and two patients had severe CSM. Investigators combined the severe and moderate CSM groups, due to few patients in the severe group, and compared them to seven age-matched controls. Diffusion spectrum basis imaging (DBSI) was used to determine the quantifiable measurements of axon and myelin injuries, cellular inflammation and axonal loss.

Results showed the median volume of DBSI-inflammation was similar the controls (266 μL) and patients with mild CSM (171 μL). Investigators found significant overlaps in the middle 50% of observations for these groups. Patients with moderate CSM had greater volumes of DBSI-inflammation (382 μL). Investigators noted a significant association between the DBSI-axon volume and clinical measures.

Researchers found inflammation and axon loss, as well as axon and myelin injury, led to neurological impairment. As the impairment severity increased, the DBSI-derived axon volume decreased. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The study received funding from NIH R01NS047592, K23NS084932 and Missouri SCRIP, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society RG 4549A4/1 and RG 5265A1.

 

Results from this study indicated diffusion spectrum basis imaging-quantified axonal loss could serve as an imaging biomarker for the prediction of functional recovery in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who undergo decompression.

Researchers prospectively enrolled patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Of these, seven patients had mild CSM; five patients had moderate CSM; and two patients had severe CSM. Investigators combined the severe and moderate CSM groups, due to few patients in the severe group, and compared them to seven age-matched controls. Diffusion spectrum basis imaging (DBSI) was used to determine the quantifiable measurements of axon and myelin injuries, cellular inflammation and axonal loss.

Results showed the median volume of DBSI-inflammation was similar the controls (266 μL) and patients with mild CSM (171 μL). Investigators found significant overlaps in the middle 50% of observations for these groups. Patients with moderate CSM had greater volumes of DBSI-inflammation (382 μL). Investigators noted a significant association between the DBSI-axon volume and clinical measures.

Researchers found inflammation and axon loss, as well as axon and myelin injury, led to neurological impairment. As the impairment severity increased, the DBSI-derived axon volume decreased. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: The study received funding from NIH R01NS047592, K23NS084932 and Missouri SCRIP, the National Multiple Sclerosis Society RG 4549A4/1 and RG 5265A1.