In the Journals

High rate of successful fusion seen with ACDF and novel allogeneic, cancellous bone matrix

Results from this study showed a higher rate of successful fusion without serious allograft-related adverse events among patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a viable cellular bone allograft combined with a polyetheretherketone interbody spacer and additional anterior fixation for symptomatic degeneration at one level.

Researchers performed a prospective, multicenter study of 31 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody spacer and anterior fixation. The viable cellular bone allograft (Trinity Evolution; processed by the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation) was placed within the interbody spacer for all patients. Radiographic fusion was assessed at 6 months and 12 months. Investigators assessed function with the Neck Disability Index and used the VAS to assess for neck and arm pain.

Results showed patients with a PEEK interbody spacer and the allograft had a fusion rate of 78.6% at 6 months. At 12 months, the fusion rate was 93.5%. Investigators noted the 6-month fusion rates for patients who were smokers (current or former) or diabetic were 70%, and 100%, respectively. Patients who were overweight or obese/extremely obese had rates of 70% and 82%, respectively. The fusion rates for these groups were 100%, 100%, 100% and 85%, respectively, at 12 months. Neck function and neck/arm pain improved significantly at both 6 months and 12 months.

Investigators found no serious allograft-related adverse events. They also noted none of the patients needed additional cervical surgeries. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: Vanichkachorn reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.  

 

 

Results from this study showed a higher rate of successful fusion without serious allograft-related adverse events among patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a viable cellular bone allograft combined with a polyetheretherketone interbody spacer and additional anterior fixation for symptomatic degeneration at one level.

Researchers performed a prospective, multicenter study of 31 patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) interbody spacer and anterior fixation. The viable cellular bone allograft (Trinity Evolution; processed by the Musculoskeletal Transplant Foundation) was placed within the interbody spacer for all patients. Radiographic fusion was assessed at 6 months and 12 months. Investigators assessed function with the Neck Disability Index and used the VAS to assess for neck and arm pain.

Results showed patients with a PEEK interbody spacer and the allograft had a fusion rate of 78.6% at 6 months. At 12 months, the fusion rate was 93.5%. Investigators noted the 6-month fusion rates for patients who were smokers (current or former) or diabetic were 70%, and 100%, respectively. Patients who were overweight or obese/extremely obese had rates of 70% and 82%, respectively. The fusion rates for these groups were 100%, 100%, 100% and 85%, respectively, at 12 months. Neck function and neck/arm pain improved significantly at both 6 months and 12 months.

Investigators found no serious allograft-related adverse events. They also noted none of the patients needed additional cervical surgeries. by Monica Jaramillo

 

Disclosures: Vanichkachorn reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.