Meeting News Coverage

Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency high in patients with rheumatic, inflammatory bowel diseases

A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was observed in patients with rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and polymyalgia rheumatica, as well as in patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, according to the results of a study.

Researchers enrolled 136 patients with rheumatic diseases, including 87 with rheumatoid arthritis, 38 with psoriatic arthritis, eight with ankylosing spondylitis and three with polymyalgia rheumatica, and 45 patients with irritable bowel diseases (IBDs), including 24 patients with Crohn’s disease and 21 with ulcerative colitis. Biologic therapy was prescribed to 119 of the patients overall, and 62 patients received conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

Deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D were common in all patient groups, but patients with IBD had significantly lower levels than patients with rheumatic diseases, with up to 75.6% of patients with IBD observed to have low vitamin D levels compared with up to 61.8% of patients with rheumatic diseases.

Patients who received biologic therapy were more likely to have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D compared with patients who received conventional DMARDs, according to the researchers. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Bruzzese V, et al. Paper #AB0400. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency was observed in patients with rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and polymyalgia rheumatica, as well as in patients with Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, according to the results of a study.

Researchers enrolled 136 patients with rheumatic diseases, including 87 with rheumatoid arthritis, 38 with psoriatic arthritis, eight with ankylosing spondylitis and three with polymyalgia rheumatica, and 45 patients with irritable bowel diseases (IBDs), including 24 patients with Crohn’s disease and 21 with ulcerative colitis. Biologic therapy was prescribed to 119 of the patients overall, and 62 patients received conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs).

Deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D were common in all patient groups, but patients with IBD had significantly lower levels than patients with rheumatic diseases, with up to 75.6% of patients with IBD observed to have low vitamin D levels compared with up to 61.8% of patients with rheumatic diseases.

Patients who received biologic therapy were more likely to have deficient or insufficient levels of vitamin D compared with patients who received conventional DMARDs, according to the researchers. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Bruzzese V, et al. Paper #AB0400. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.