Meeting News Coverage

Vitamin D deficiency in patients with SpA is prevalent, may be related to disease activity

Low levels of vitamin D are prevalent patients with spondyloarthritis worldwide, associated seasonally and may be related to disease activity, according to the results of an international, cross-sectional study.

Researchers studied 3,984 patients enrolled in the ASAS/COMOSpA study across 15 countries on four continents and identified 1,558 patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) with available vitamin D data. Vitamin D supplementation was active with 528 patients who were excluded, leaving 1,030 included in the study.

Demographic and geographic information and patient clinical and serological data were collected, including the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity ScoreC-reactive protein (ASDAS-CRP) score, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score, swollen and tender joint counts, Physicians’ Global Assessment and comorbidities.

The mean patient vitamin D level was 22.2 ng/mL, and 527 had vitamin D deficiency.

Univariate analysis revealed that ptients who were deficient in vitamin D were more likely to have a higher BMI, live in Europe, live at a latitude above 37°, present radiographic sacroiliitis and test positive for the HLA-B27 gene.

An association between vitamin D deficiency and winter/spring remained and radiographic sacroiliitis after adjusting for age, gender and other variables. No correlation was found between levels of vitamin D and other comorbidities.

The researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiency in patients with SpA occurs with frequency and that deficiency may be associated with disease activity and severity. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Fernandes S, et al. Paper #AB0789. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology. June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Low levels of vitamin D are prevalent patients with spondyloarthritis worldwide, associated seasonally and may be related to disease activity, according to the results of an international, cross-sectional study.

Researchers studied 3,984 patients enrolled in the ASAS/COMOSpA study across 15 countries on four continents and identified 1,558 patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA) with available vitamin D data. Vitamin D supplementation was active with 528 patients who were excluded, leaving 1,030 included in the study.

Demographic and geographic information and patient clinical and serological data were collected, including the Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity ScoreC-reactive protein (ASDAS-CRP) score, the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) score, swollen and tender joint counts, Physicians’ Global Assessment and comorbidities.

The mean patient vitamin D level was 22.2 ng/mL, and 527 had vitamin D deficiency.

Univariate analysis revealed that ptients who were deficient in vitamin D were more likely to have a higher BMI, live in Europe, live at a latitude above 37°, present radiographic sacroiliitis and test positive for the HLA-B27 gene.

An association between vitamin D deficiency and winter/spring remained and radiographic sacroiliitis after adjusting for age, gender and other variables. No correlation was found between levels of vitamin D and other comorbidities.

The researchers concluded that vitamin D deficiency in patients with SpA occurs with frequency and that deficiency may be associated with disease activity and severity. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Fernandes S, et al. Paper #AB0789. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology. June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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