Meeting News Coverage

Human stem cell transplantation may benefit patients with SSc

Patients with systemic sclerosis showed a decrease in skin fibrosis and improvement in serological markers following treatment with human stem cell transplantation, according to researchers from the JSC National Scientific Medical Research Center in Astana, Kazakhstan.

Twenty-three women with systemic sclerosis (SSc) who had organ and skin involvement were studied. Patients were mean age 42.9 years with disease duration of 8.52 years. Patients were assessed using the Rodnan skin score (RSS) collagen biopsy, echocardigraph and other instrumental examinations and blood sera was for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), -globulin, fibrinogen and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) at baseline and follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months.

Patients were treated with human stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months in two stages. During stage one, myelotransplantation was conducted and followed by biotechnological separation of hematopoietic stem cell fractions. In the second stage, IV cells were infused at 50 m/hr with the minimum volume of viable at 96%.

The RSS improved from 18.45 at baseline to 15.58 at 3 months, 13.14 at 6 months and 10.66 at 12 months. Prior to treatment dystrophy with keratin deposits, atrophy of appendages and increasing connective tissue fibers were observed in the patients and at 12 months, an increase in basal cells was seen on microscopy and connective tissue fibers were reduced.

Serological improvements were seen after treatment in levels of ESR, CRP, fibrinogen, globulin and ANA titers, with CRP reduced from mean 9.04 mg/L to 2.2 mg/L after 12 months. Mean ESR was lowered from 25.39 mm/h to 18.81 mm/h, lung function stabilized and signs of pulmonary hypertension was reduced. - by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Krivoruchko N, et al. Paper #FRI0476. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology. June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with systemic sclerosis showed a decrease in skin fibrosis and improvement in serological markers following treatment with human stem cell transplantation, according to researchers from the JSC National Scientific Medical Research Center in Astana, Kazakhstan.

Twenty-three women with systemic sclerosis (SSc) who had organ and skin involvement were studied. Patients were mean age 42.9 years with disease duration of 8.52 years. Patients were assessed using the Rodnan skin score (RSS) collagen biopsy, echocardigraph and other instrumental examinations and blood sera was for the erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), -globulin, fibrinogen and antinuclear antibodies (ANA) at baseline and follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months.

Patients were treated with human stem cell transplantation (HSCT) at 0, 3, 6 and 12 months in two stages. During stage one, myelotransplantation was conducted and followed by biotechnological separation of hematopoietic stem cell fractions. In the second stage, IV cells were infused at 50 m/hr with the minimum volume of viable at 96%.

The RSS improved from 18.45 at baseline to 15.58 at 3 months, 13.14 at 6 months and 10.66 at 12 months. Prior to treatment dystrophy with keratin deposits, atrophy of appendages and increasing connective tissue fibers were observed in the patients and at 12 months, an increase in basal cells was seen on microscopy and connective tissue fibers were reduced.

Serological improvements were seen after treatment in levels of ESR, CRP, fibrinogen, globulin and ANA titers, with CRP reduced from mean 9.04 mg/L to 2.2 mg/L after 12 months. Mean ESR was lowered from 25.39 mm/h to 18.81 mm/h, lung function stabilized and signs of pulmonary hypertension was reduced. - by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Krivoruchko N, et al. Paper #FRI0476. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology. June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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