In the Journals

Nearly one-third of patients with RA develop depression within 5 years

Approximately 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis developed depression within 5 years of diagnosis, according to a recent cohort study of more than 4,000 patients from the United Kingdom.

Louis Jacob, PhD, in the faculty of medicine at the University of Paris 5, and colleagues assessed 4,187 patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) between 2000 and 2014 and excluded those who were diagnosed with depression. The primary outcome was rate of depression within 5 years of RA diagnosis.

After 5 years, 23.7% of men and 36.5% of women developed depression, with women significantly more likely to develop the disease than men (HR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.42-1.84). Age and Charlson comorbidity score had no significant effect on the risk for depression. – by Will Offit

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Approximately 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis developed depression within 5 years of diagnosis, according to a recent cohort study of more than 4,000 patients from the United Kingdom.

Louis Jacob, PhD, in the faculty of medicine at the University of Paris 5, and colleagues assessed 4,187 patients who were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) between 2000 and 2014 and excluded those who were diagnosed with depression. The primary outcome was rate of depression within 5 years of RA diagnosis.

After 5 years, 23.7% of men and 36.5% of women developed depression, with women significantly more likely to develop the disease than men (HR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.42-1.84). Age and Charlson comorbidity score had no significant effect on the risk for depression. – by Will Offit

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.