Meeting News Coverage

Low vitamin D, decreased bone mass prevalent among patients with PsA despite sun exposure

Vitamin D insufficiency was common among patients with psoriatic arthritis, among whom more than half had decreased bone mass, according to the findings of a study presented recently.

Fifty patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) without axial involvement were included in the study. Twelve patients were premenopausal women, 22 were postmenopausal women and 16 were men. Mean disease duration was 111 months. Clinical manifestations of PsA observed among the patients included oligoarticular involvement in 32% of patients and polyarticular involvement in 54% of patients.

Serum calcium, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, P1NP and beta-CTx were measured, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels were collected. Bone mineral density was calculated using dual X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and hip, and the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) were calculated. Functional impairment was determined by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ).

Insufficient levels of vitamin D were found in 16 patients (32%), and 22% of patients had deficient levels. Osteoporosis was observed in 14% of patients, and osteopenia was observed in 49% of patients, with a higher frequency of 75% observed in postmenopausal women. P1NP and beta-CTx were within a normal range, according to the researchers.

An inverse correlation was seen between levels of vitamin D and ESR, CRP and HAQ, with mean ESR at 10.9 mm/hr, CRP at 5.38 mg/L and mean HAQ score of 0.33; however, the results did not reach statistical significance due to the small sample size, the researchers reported. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Dangond CV, et al. Paper #SAT0282. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Vitamin D insufficiency was common among patients with psoriatic arthritis, among whom more than half had decreased bone mass, according to the findings of a study presented recently.

Fifty patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) without axial involvement were included in the study. Twelve patients were premenopausal women, 22 were postmenopausal women and 16 were men. Mean disease duration was 111 months. Clinical manifestations of PsA observed among the patients included oligoarticular involvement in 32% of patients and polyarticular involvement in 54% of patients.

Serum calcium, vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, P1NP and beta-CTx were measured, and C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) levels were collected. Bone mineral density was calculated using dual X-ray absorptiometry of the lumbar spine and hip, and the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) were calculated. Functional impairment was determined by the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ).

Insufficient levels of vitamin D were found in 16 patients (32%), and 22% of patients had deficient levels. Osteoporosis was observed in 14% of patients, and osteopenia was observed in 49% of patients, with a higher frequency of 75% observed in postmenopausal women. P1NP and beta-CTx were within a normal range, according to the researchers.

An inverse correlation was seen between levels of vitamin D and ESR, CRP and HAQ, with mean ESR at 10.9 mm/hr, CRP at 5.38 mg/L and mean HAQ score of 0.33; however, the results did not reach statistical significance due to the small sample size, the researchers reported. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Dangond CV, et al. Paper #SAT0282. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.