Meeting News Coverage

Study links daily cod-liver oil intake to lower BMI in patients with psoriatic arthritis

A significantly lower BMI was observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis who ingested cod liver on a daily basis but was not associated with consumption of sausages, hamburgers, rice, pasta or other foods, according to results of a study.

Researchers recruited a cohort of 100 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who visited an outpatient clinic in Norway. Patients’ mean age was 51.6 years, mean BMI was 28.6 kg/m2 and mean Disease Activity index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) was 19.6. Mean disease duration was 9.9 years. Women comprised 55% of the group; 16% reported active smoking, and 64% had consumed alcohol within the prior month. All patients met Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. In addition to other data collected, a nutritional questionnaire was administered.

An inverse correlation was seen between BMI and the consumption of cod-liver oil, although the significance was slightly lower in adjusted models, the researchers found. Unjustified analysis showed a decrease of 3.1 kg/m2 in BMI in patients with PsA who ingested cod-liver oil daily, and a decrease of 2.9 kg/m2 after adjusting for age, sex and lifestyle factors. No correlations were seen between BMI and the consumption of sausages, hamburgers, pasta, rice, whole milk, fatty fish, sweet beverages, chocolate, coffee or omega-3 tablets, or with physical exercise or educational level.

Cod-liver oil, rich in vitamin D, is consumed daily as a cultural norm in Norway, according to the researchers. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Michelsen B, et al. Paper #AB0797. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

A significantly lower BMI was observed in patients with psoriatic arthritis who ingested cod liver on a daily basis but was not associated with consumption of sausages, hamburgers, rice, pasta or other foods, according to results of a study.

Researchers recruited a cohort of 100 patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) who visited an outpatient clinic in Norway. Patients’ mean age was 51.6 years, mean BMI was 28.6 kg/m2 and mean Disease Activity index for Psoriatic Arthritis (DAPSA) was 19.6. Mean disease duration was 9.9 years. Women comprised 55% of the group; 16% reported active smoking, and 64% had consumed alcohol within the prior month. All patients met Classification of Psoriatic Arthritis (CASPAR) criteria. In addition to other data collected, a nutritional questionnaire was administered.

An inverse correlation was seen between BMI and the consumption of cod-liver oil, although the significance was slightly lower in adjusted models, the researchers found. Unjustified analysis showed a decrease of 3.1 kg/m2 in BMI in patients with PsA who ingested cod-liver oil daily, and a decrease of 2.9 kg/m2 after adjusting for age, sex and lifestyle factors. No correlations were seen between BMI and the consumption of sausages, hamburgers, pasta, rice, whole milk, fatty fish, sweet beverages, chocolate, coffee or omega-3 tablets, or with physical exercise or educational level.

Cod-liver oil, rich in vitamin D, is consumed daily as a cultural norm in Norway, according to the researchers. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Michelsen B, et al. Paper #AB0797. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.