Johnson & Johnson announces ruling related to its infliximab biosimilar

Johnson & Johnson announced the District of Massachusetts Federal Court issued a ruling on the summary judgment motion filed by Celltrion Healthcare Co. Ltd., Celltrion Inc. and Hospira Healthcare Corporation in the infringement lawsuits filed by Janssen Biotech Inc. regarding Remicade.

According to the release, the court ruled in favor of Celltrion and Hospira, noting that U.S. Patent No. 6,284,471 for Remicade is invalid. Janssen reportedly plans to appeal the court’s decision in the federal circuit and will also continue the appeal process in proceedings related to the patent through the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. The company awaits a date for the oral hearing for the appeal.

“Janssen will continue to defend its intellectual property rights relating to its innovative medicines. A commercial launch of an infliximab biosimilar prior to the outcome of the appeals would be considered an at-risk launch,” the release noted.

 

Reference:

www.jnj.com

 

Johnson & Johnson announced the District of Massachusetts Federal Court issued a ruling on the summary judgment motion filed by Celltrion Healthcare Co. Ltd., Celltrion Inc. and Hospira Healthcare Corporation in the infringement lawsuits filed by Janssen Biotech Inc. regarding Remicade.

According to the release, the court ruled in favor of Celltrion and Hospira, noting that U.S. Patent No. 6,284,471 for Remicade is invalid. Janssen reportedly plans to appeal the court’s decision in the federal circuit and will also continue the appeal process in proceedings related to the patent through the U.S. Patent & Trademark Office. The company awaits a date for the oral hearing for the appeal.

“Janssen will continue to defend its intellectual property rights relating to its innovative medicines. A commercial launch of an infliximab biosimilar prior to the outcome of the appeals would be considered an at-risk launch,” the release noted.

 

Reference:

www.jnj.com

 

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