In the Journals

Several patient factors linked with increased risk of knee OA in military population

In an active military population, the incidence of primary and secondary knee osteoarthritis correlated with chronological age, race, rank and branch of service, according to results.

Using the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database, researchers performed a retrospective review of 21,318 cases of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee among U.S. military, active-duty service members between 2005 and 2014. There were 19,504 cases of primary OA and 1,814 cases of secondary OA.

Results showed an increase in the adjusted incidence rates by 45% in primary OA from 0.51 in 2005 to 0.74 in 2014, and by 100% in secondary OA from 0.03 in 2005 to 0.06 in 2014. Researchers noted increasing age was a significant risk factor for primary and secondary OA. While the risk of OA increased among women aged 35 years to 39 years, according to results, incidence rate ratios decreased among women service members in the age groups younger than 20 years; 20 years to 24 years; and 25 years to 29 years. An increased risk for knee OA was also associated with black race, senior military rank and Army, Marines and Air Force services, researchers found. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Showery reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

In an active military population, the incidence of primary and secondary knee osteoarthritis correlated with chronological age, race, rank and branch of service, according to results.

Using the Defense Medical Epidemiology Database, researchers performed a retrospective review of 21,318 cases of osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee among U.S. military, active-duty service members between 2005 and 2014. There were 19,504 cases of primary OA and 1,814 cases of secondary OA.

Results showed an increase in the adjusted incidence rates by 45% in primary OA from 0.51 in 2005 to 0.74 in 2014, and by 100% in secondary OA from 0.03 in 2005 to 0.06 in 2014. Researchers noted increasing age was a significant risk factor for primary and secondary OA. While the risk of OA increased among women aged 35 years to 39 years, according to results, incidence rate ratios decreased among women service members in the age groups younger than 20 years; 20 years to 24 years; and 25 years to 29 years. An increased risk for knee OA was also associated with black race, senior military rank and Army, Marines and Air Force services, researchers found. – by Casey Tingle

 

Disclosures: Showery reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the full study for a list of all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.