23andMe announces systemic lupus erythematosus research collaboration

The personal genetics company, 23andMe, announced it has begun enrollment into a genomic study of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in collaboration with Pfizer and the Lupus Research Institute, according to a company press release.

As reported in January, the companies plan to enroll 5,000 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To be eligible for enrollment, patients must have a confirmed diagnosis of SLE by a qualified physician, agree to release medical records to 23andMe, be older than 6 years of age, submit a saliva sample for DNA testing, live in the U.S. and have access to the Internet.

The goal of the study is to reveal potential genetic associations in patients with SLE.

“The ability to effectively personalize treatments for lupus patients is limited, due in large part to our incomplete understanding of the disease,” 23andMe CEO and co-founder, Anne Wojcicki, said in the release. “We hope to change that by studying human genetics alongside environmental and health history factors to ultimately help inform better treatment options for lupus patients.”

Other data from the participating patients’ medical records will be incorporated into the study dataset, in addition to results from a questionnaire.

“By enhancing our understanding of the underlying biology of the disease, we hope to better support our clinical research activities and development programs,” Belen Carrillo-Rivas, DPhil, head of Research and Development Innovation Projects, BioTherapeutics Research and Development at Pfizer, said in the release.

Recruitment is expected to be completed by mid-2016.

Reference: www.23andme.com.

The personal genetics company, 23andMe, announced it has begun enrollment into a genomic study of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus in collaboration with Pfizer and the Lupus Research Institute, according to a company press release.

As reported in January, the companies plan to enroll 5,000 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). To be eligible for enrollment, patients must have a confirmed diagnosis of SLE by a qualified physician, agree to release medical records to 23andMe, be older than 6 years of age, submit a saliva sample for DNA testing, live in the U.S. and have access to the Internet.

The goal of the study is to reveal potential genetic associations in patients with SLE.

“The ability to effectively personalize treatments for lupus patients is limited, due in large part to our incomplete understanding of the disease,” 23andMe CEO and co-founder, Anne Wojcicki, said in the release. “We hope to change that by studying human genetics alongside environmental and health history factors to ultimately help inform better treatment options for lupus patients.”

Other data from the participating patients’ medical records will be incorporated into the study dataset, in addition to results from a questionnaire.

“By enhancing our understanding of the underlying biology of the disease, we hope to better support our clinical research activities and development programs,” Belen Carrillo-Rivas, DPhil, head of Research and Development Innovation Projects, BioTherapeutics Research and Development at Pfizer, said in the release.

Recruitment is expected to be completed by mid-2016.

Reference: www.23andme.com.