Meeting News Coverage

Thyroid dysfunction common in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were more likely to have thyroid dysfunction compared with healthy adults, according to recently published research.

Researchers studied 167 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were evaluated for serum free T3, free T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Any patients who had abnormal thyroid function tests were given additional testing, including tests for anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (Ab TG), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (AbTPO) and thyrotropin receptor antibodies.

Normal thyroid functioning was seen in 119 patients, whereas 11 patients had subclinical hyperthyroidism, six patients were found to have hyperthyroidism, 19 patients had subclinical hypothyroidism and 12 patients had clinical hypothyroidism.

Patients with SLE and hypothyroidism were found to have statistically significantly higher Ab TG, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure Index scores compared with patients with euthyroidism or hyperthyroidism, according to the researchers.

No overall association between the groups and Ab TG was seen; however, there was a positive correlation between Ab TG and disease activity, and the hypothyroid group had a higher frequency of Ab TG compared with patients with hyperthyroidism.

Ab TG was seen in one patient with hyperthyroidism, and one patient was positive for TSH receptor antibody and clinical characteristics of Grave’s disease.

The authors concluded that patients with SLE should be tested for thyroid function parameters as routine practice. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Monova DV, et al. Paper #AB0532. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were more likely to have thyroid dysfunction compared with healthy adults, according to recently published research.

Researchers studied 167 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who were evaluated for serum free T3, free T4 and thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH). Any patients who had abnormal thyroid function tests were given additional testing, including tests for anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (Ab TG), anti-thyroid peroxidase antibodies (AbTPO) and thyrotropin receptor antibodies.

Normal thyroid functioning was seen in 119 patients, whereas 11 patients had subclinical hyperthyroidism, six patients were found to have hyperthyroidism, 19 patients had subclinical hypothyroidism and 12 patients had clinical hypothyroidism.

Patients with SLE and hypothyroidism were found to have statistically significantly higher Ab TG, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index and Systemic Lupus Activity Measure Index scores compared with patients with euthyroidism or hyperthyroidism, according to the researchers.

No overall association between the groups and Ab TG was seen; however, there was a positive correlation between Ab TG and disease activity, and the hypothyroid group had a higher frequency of Ab TG compared with patients with hyperthyroidism.

Ab TG was seen in one patient with hyperthyroidism, and one patient was positive for TSH receptor antibody and clinical characteristics of Grave’s disease.

The authors concluded that patients with SLE should be tested for thyroid function parameters as routine practice. – by Shirley Pulawski

Reference:

Monova DV, et al. Paper #AB0532. Presented at: European League Against Rheumatism Annual European Congress of Rheumatology; June 10-13, 2015; Rome.

Disclosure: The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.