In the Journals

Bariatric surgery decreased SUA levels, XOD activity in obese patients

Obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery showed a significant decrease in serum uric acid levels and decreased xanthine oxidase activity at 6 months after the weight-loss surgery, according to recent research.

“[I]n summary, our study showed that surgery-induced weight loss in obese patients significantly reduced [serum uric acid] SUA levels and [xanthine oxidase] XOD activity,” Pascal Richette, MD, PhD, from the Fédération de Rhumatologie at Hôpital Lariboisière in Paris, and colleagues wrote in their study. “Our data suggest that reduced SUA levels are not mediated by decreased XOD activity nor by improved insulin resistance, but could be mediated by decreased triglyceride levels.”

Pascal Richette

 

Richette and colleagues evaluated the SUA levels, circulating XOD activity and metabolic status of 154 patients with severe obesity participating in a bariatric surgery program. Overall, 81% of patients were female, had a mean age of 41 ± 12.3 years and had a mean BMI of 47.8 ± 7.2 kg/m2.

At 6-month follow-up, the mean weight loss was 31.3 ± 7.8 kg and there was a reduction in SUA levels of approximately 10% (4.98 ± 1.21 mg/dl) compared with baseline measurements (5.52 ± 1.33 mg/dl), according to the abstract. Richette and colleagues found the greatest SUA level decrease of approximately 18% was in 48 patients who were hyperuricemic, and that these patients also showed decreased circulating XOD activity with weight loss.

The researchers performed a multiple linear regression analysis that showed an association between decreased SUA levels and BMI, as well as decreased triglyceride levels. However, there was no association between decreased SUA levels and biologic factors, such as XOD activity, insulin resistance, adipokine levels or inflammatory variables like high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, fibrinogen and orosomucoid, according to the abstract. – by Jeff Craven

 

Disclosure: The researchers report support from the Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, ADAPT, the Association Rhumatisme et Travail of the Hopital Lariboisie and the Direction of Clinical Research.

Obese patients who underwent bariatric surgery showed a significant decrease in serum uric acid levels and decreased xanthine oxidase activity at 6 months after the weight-loss surgery, according to recent research.

“[I]n summary, our study showed that surgery-induced weight loss in obese patients significantly reduced [serum uric acid] SUA levels and [xanthine oxidase] XOD activity,” Pascal Richette, MD, PhD, from the Fédération de Rhumatologie at Hôpital Lariboisière in Paris, and colleagues wrote in their study. “Our data suggest that reduced SUA levels are not mediated by decreased XOD activity nor by improved insulin resistance, but could be mediated by decreased triglyceride levels.”

Pascal Richette

 

Richette and colleagues evaluated the SUA levels, circulating XOD activity and metabolic status of 154 patients with severe obesity participating in a bariatric surgery program. Overall, 81% of patients were female, had a mean age of 41 ± 12.3 years and had a mean BMI of 47.8 ± 7.2 kg/m2.

At 6-month follow-up, the mean weight loss was 31.3 ± 7.8 kg and there was a reduction in SUA levels of approximately 10% (4.98 ± 1.21 mg/dl) compared with baseline measurements (5.52 ± 1.33 mg/dl), according to the abstract. Richette and colleagues found the greatest SUA level decrease of approximately 18% was in 48 patients who were hyperuricemic, and that these patients also showed decreased circulating XOD activity with weight loss.

The researchers performed a multiple linear regression analysis that showed an association between decreased SUA levels and BMI, as well as decreased triglyceride levels. However, there was no association between decreased SUA levels and biologic factors, such as XOD activity, insulin resistance, adipokine levels or inflammatory variables like high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, fibrinogen and orosomucoid, according to the abstract. – by Jeff Craven

 

Disclosure: The researchers report support from the Assistance Publique-Hopitaux de Paris, ADAPT, the Association Rhumatisme et Travail of the Hopital Lariboisie and the Direction of Clinical Research.