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Resiliency, well-being alone are not solutions to burnout

SAN FRANCISCO — Contrary to what many believe, resilience and well-being are not a solution to the widespread physician burnout problem, but they are important elements for every physician and psychiatrist to know, Rashi Aggarwal, MD, associate professor and program director of residency training, department of psychiatry, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, discussed in a video.

Psychiatrists and physicians can help inform medical school students, patients and the general population on what improves resilience, well-being and happiness separate from burnout, Aggarwal said.

“Physician burnout is a widespread, systemic problem that needs a systemic organizational response to solve,” she said. “Resiliency and well-being is not yoga and broccoli alone, and it is not a solution to burnout, but it is definitely something we should all know more about.”

Disclosures: Aggarwal reports no relevant financial disclosures.

SAN FRANCISCO — Contrary to what many believe, resilience and well-being are not a solution to the widespread physician burnout problem, but they are important elements for every physician and psychiatrist to know, Rashi Aggarwal, MD, associate professor and program director of residency training, department of psychiatry, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, discussed in a video.

Psychiatrists and physicians can help inform medical school students, patients and the general population on what improves resilience, well-being and happiness separate from burnout, Aggarwal said.

“Physician burnout is a widespread, systemic problem that needs a systemic organizational response to solve,” she said. “Resiliency and well-being is not yoga and broccoli alone, and it is not a solution to burnout, but it is definitely something we should all know more about.”

Disclosures: Aggarwal reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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