Psychiatric Annals

BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHIATRY

Abstract

Robert G. Grenell and Sabit Gray, editors BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHIATRY Volumes 1 and 2. New York: Raven Press. 1976, Volume 1: 613 pp., $35. Volume 2: 477 pp., $35.

These volumes are sponsored by the Society of Biological Psychiatry. As is stated in the editorial preface, they are not intended to be a textbook in biologic psychiatry. Although this reviewer was aware of that caveat as he read, there was nevertheless a certain sense of disappointment that the various chapters did not present him with the "answers" to the allimportant questions concerning the biologic foundations of psychiatry. We are all aware of Freud's letter to Marie Bonaparte in which he expressed his view that someday we would have neurophysiologic explanations of his psychoanalytic theories. Well, we're not there yet!

However, my disappointment was naïve. The volumes are an excellent review of the up-todate knowledge in many areas fundamental to the biologic understanidng of psychologic phenomena. Chapters include reviews of genetics, perception, drives, sleep, memory, and cognition. The second volume reviews the biochemistry and genetics of mental illness, psychopharmacology, and psychosomatics and contains two interesting chapters on information processing and neuropsychiatry.

The volumes are exhaustive and provide excellent references in each area. They will provide valuable resources to those working or teaching in the field of biologic psychiatry.…

Robert G. Grenell and Sabit Gray, editors BIOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF PSYCHIATRY Volumes 1 and 2. New York: Raven Press. 1976, Volume 1: 613 pp., $35. Volume 2: 477 pp., $35.

These volumes are sponsored by the Society of Biological Psychiatry. As is stated in the editorial preface, they are not intended to be a textbook in biologic psychiatry. Although this reviewer was aware of that caveat as he read, there was nevertheless a certain sense of disappointment that the various chapters did not present him with the "answers" to the allimportant questions concerning the biologic foundations of psychiatry. We are all aware of Freud's letter to Marie Bonaparte in which he expressed his view that someday we would have neurophysiologic explanations of his psychoanalytic theories. Well, we're not there yet!

However, my disappointment was naïve. The volumes are an excellent review of the up-todate knowledge in many areas fundamental to the biologic understanidng of psychologic phenomena. Chapters include reviews of genetics, perception, drives, sleep, memory, and cognition. The second volume reviews the biochemistry and genetics of mental illness, psychopharmacology, and psychosomatics and contains two interesting chapters on information processing and neuropsychiatry.

The volumes are exhaustive and provide excellent references in each area. They will provide valuable resources to those working or teaching in the field of biologic psychiatry.

10.3928/0048-5713-19770601-19

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