Psychiatric Annals

CLONOTHERAPY, A MANUAL FOR CONVULSIVE THERAPIES

Enrique Delgado-Fourzan, MD

Abstract

Blackman, L. H. CLONOTHERAPY, A MANUAL FOR CONVULSIVE THERAPIES Lake Worth, Fla.: Lionel H. Blackman, M.D., 1974, 104 pp.

The author of this succinct monograph sets out to provide a basic, simplified working knowledge of the convulsive therapies. He accomplishes his task by offering a practical synopsis of the current modalities of inhalant and electroconvulsive techniques, along with abundant, informative illustrations.

He wishes to eliminate from the technique the onus that is attached to it by advocating a change from the vexatious "shock therapy" to the more euphonious term "clonotherapy/' and he argues this point with enthusiasm.

The success of his effort to impart a working knowledge of the therapy to the student and the new practitioner can be faulted by the fact that he fails to forewarn what the real and serious hazards of the administration of ECT are. It is our belief that it would be wiser to convey to residents the necessity of obtaining formal training on resuscitative measures if they intend to undertake the responsibility for administering the anesthetic and the muscle relaxant themselves. We recommend that the procedure be done with the assistance of an anesthesiologist.

Similar feelings motivate us to recommend against the administration of ECT in an office because of the potential risks, particularly those that might result from a lack of adequate equipment or proper facilities. Therefore, if outpatient or ambulatory therapy is to be given, it is our belief that it should be administered in a hospital.

The monograph bespeaks Dr. Blackman's dedication to his patients as well as his desire to share with his colleagues the benefit of his knowledge and research.…

Blackman, L. H. CLONOTHERAPY, A MANUAL FOR CONVULSIVE THERAPIES Lake Worth, Fla.: Lionel H. Blackman, M.D., 1974, 104 pp.

The author of this succinct monograph sets out to provide a basic, simplified working knowledge of the convulsive therapies. He accomplishes his task by offering a practical synopsis of the current modalities of inhalant and electroconvulsive techniques, along with abundant, informative illustrations.

He wishes to eliminate from the technique the onus that is attached to it by advocating a change from the vexatious "shock therapy" to the more euphonious term "clonotherapy/' and he argues this point with enthusiasm.

The success of his effort to impart a working knowledge of the therapy to the student and the new practitioner can be faulted by the fact that he fails to forewarn what the real and serious hazards of the administration of ECT are. It is our belief that it would be wiser to convey to residents the necessity of obtaining formal training on resuscitative measures if they intend to undertake the responsibility for administering the anesthetic and the muscle relaxant themselves. We recommend that the procedure be done with the assistance of an anesthesiologist.

Similar feelings motivate us to recommend against the administration of ECT in an office because of the potential risks, particularly those that might result from a lack of adequate equipment or proper facilities. Therefore, if outpatient or ambulatory therapy is to be given, it is our belief that it should be administered in a hospital.

The monograph bespeaks Dr. Blackman's dedication to his patients as well as his desire to share with his colleagues the benefit of his knowledge and research.

10.3928/0048-5713-19750901-11

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