Psychiatric Annals

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ANNUAL REVIEW OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

John Paul Brady, MD

Abstract

Franks. C. M., and Wilson, G. T., eds. ANNUAL REVIEW OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY, THEORY AND PRACTICE. New York: Brunner/Mazel. 1974, 769 pp., $25.

For many years, behavior therapy or behavior modification was regarded as the sysapplication of princiof learning to the underand treatment of disof behavior. In recent however, there has been salutary tendency to regard therapy in somewhat terms - as an apto clinical problems that the methods of experimenand social psychology as as some of the existing of these two empirical sciences.

This broader view of behavior is reflected in this secof a series of annual reof the field. The editors collected what they consider the most innovative and noteworthy articles behavior therapy published the past year. Particularly valuable is the introductory chapter by Drs. Michael J. Mahoney, Alan E. Kazdin, and Norman J. Lesswing, all in the Psychology Department of the Pennsylvania State University, maps out the boundary of behavior therapy and places it in historical and theoretical perspective.

This original article is followed by 42 reprinted papers conveniently grouped as follows: systematic desensitization and related techniques, aversion procedures, token economies, the self-regulation of behavior, assessment and methodology, behavioral intervention in the family and community, behavior modification with children, and behavior therapy of sexual disorders; finally, there is a small number of articles that report new techniques and enlightening case studies. Behavioral techniques are not limited to the treatment of traditional psychiatric disorders, but have important applications in more general physiologic and medical problems. Thus, appropriately, this review also includes material on the treatment of migraine and tension headaches by biofeedback techniques (a special application of operant conditioning), behavioral procedures for modifying chronic pain, and experiments on patient control of cardiac functioning by operant-reinforcement procedures.

The selection of articles for this year's review is excellent, and each section includes introductory comments by the editors that help to integrate the studies covered and relate them to the field as a whole. The general psychiatric reader, as well as the clinician with special interest and knowledge in behavior therapy, should find this book of great value.…

Franks. C. M., and Wilson, G. T., eds. ANNUAL REVIEW OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY, THEORY AND PRACTICE. New York: Brunner/Mazel. 1974, 769 pp., $25.

For many years, behavior therapy or behavior modification was regarded as the sysapplication of princiof learning to the underand treatment of disof behavior. In recent however, there has been salutary tendency to regard therapy in somewhat terms - as an apto clinical problems that the methods of experimenand social psychology as as some of the existing of these two empirical sciences.

This broader view of behavior is reflected in this secof a series of annual reof the field. The editors collected what they consider the most innovative and noteworthy articles behavior therapy published the past year. Particularly valuable is the introductory chapter by Drs. Michael J. Mahoney, Alan E. Kazdin, and Norman J. Lesswing, all in the Psychology Department of the Pennsylvania State University, maps out the boundary of behavior therapy and places it in historical and theoretical perspective.

This original article is followed by 42 reprinted papers conveniently grouped as follows: systematic desensitization and related techniques, aversion procedures, token economies, the self-regulation of behavior, assessment and methodology, behavioral intervention in the family and community, behavior modification with children, and behavior therapy of sexual disorders; finally, there is a small number of articles that report new techniques and enlightening case studies. Behavioral techniques are not limited to the treatment of traditional psychiatric disorders, but have important applications in more general physiologic and medical problems. Thus, appropriately, this review also includes material on the treatment of migraine and tension headaches by biofeedback techniques (a special application of operant conditioning), behavioral procedures for modifying chronic pain, and experiments on patient control of cardiac functioning by operant-reinforcement procedures.

The selection of articles for this year's review is excellent, and each section includes introductory comments by the editors that help to integrate the studies covered and relate them to the field as a whole. The general psychiatric reader, as well as the clinician with special interest and knowledge in behavior therapy, should find this book of great value.

10.3928/0048-5713-19750701-10

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