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CNE Article 

Partial Hospitalization: Compatible with Evidence-Based and Recovery-Oriented Treatment?

Philip T. Yanos, PhD; Betty Vreeland, MSN, APRN, NP-C, BC; Shula Minsky, EdD; Rice B. Fuller, PhD; David Roe, PhD

Abstract

Partial hospitalization is a service modality that some have suggested is incompatible with both evidence-based and recovery-oriented treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of this assumption. Toward this end, a specific partial hospitalization program was examined using administrative data, self-reports regarding recovery orientation, and fidelity ratings from independent assessors. Findings support that the partial hospitalization program studied has reasonable lengths of stay, provides recovery-oriented services, and has implemented evidence-based practices. We conclude that partial hospitalization programs have the potential to become part of an evidence-based and recovery-oriented system.

Authors

Dr. Yanos is Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, New York; Ms. Vreeland is Program Coordinator, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-University Behavioral HealthCare (UMDNJ-UBHC), Center for Excellence in Psychiatry, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, UMDNJ School of Nursing, and Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Family Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey; Dr. Minsky is Director of Quality Improvement, UMDNJ-UBHC, and Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey; Dr. Fuller is Director, Counselling Services, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada; and Dr. Roe is Chair, Department of Community Mental Health, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel. The authors disclose that they have no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Philip T. Yanos, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W. 59th Street, New York, NY 10019; e-mail: .pyanos@jjay.cuny.edu

10.3928/02793695-20090201-15

Partial hospitalization is a service modality that some have suggested is incompatible with both evidence-based and recovery-oriented treatment. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of this assumption. Toward this end, a specific partial hospitalization program was examined using administrative data, self-reports regarding recovery orientation, and fidelity ratings from independent assessors. Findings support that the partial hospitalization program studied has reasonable lengths of stay, provides recovery-oriented services, and has implemented evidence-based practices. We conclude that partial hospitalization programs have the potential to become part of an evidence-based and recovery-oriented system.

Dr. Yanos is Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, New York, New York; Ms. Vreeland is Program Coordinator, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey-University Behavioral HealthCare (UMDNJ-UBHC), Center for Excellence in Psychiatry, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing, UMDNJ School of Nursing, and Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry & Family Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey; Dr. Minsky is Director of Quality Improvement, UMDNJ-UBHC, and Associate Professor, Department of Psychiatry, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey; Dr. Fuller is Director, Counselling Services, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada; and Dr. Roe is Chair, Department of Community Mental Health, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Studies, University of Haifa, Mount Carmel, Haifa, Israel. The authors disclose that they have no significant financial interests in any product or class of products discussed directly or indirectly in this activity, including research support.

Address correspondence to Philip T. Yanos, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York, 445 W. 59th Street, New York, NY 10019; e-mail: .pyanos@jjay.cuny.edu

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