Meeting NewsVideo

VIDEO: How can we protect our brains?

NEW ORLEANS — “Something I’m seeing more and more are the consequences of either major traumatic brain injury in a single episode in older adults, as well as the effects of repeated, concussive-type injuries in younger adults, who are unfortunately developing early-onset Alzheimer’s disease,” George Grossberg, MD, of Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, told Healio.com/Psychiatry.

For younger populations, Grossberg recommended avoiding repetitive concussive injuries.

For middle and older populations, he recommended improving gait and balance through Thai Chi and yoga exercise.

NEW ORLEANS — “Something I’m seeing more and more are the consequences of either major traumatic brain injury in a single episode in older adults, as well as the effects of repeated, concussive-type injuries in younger adults, who are unfortunately developing early-onset Alzheimer’s disease,” George Grossberg, MD, of Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, told Healio.com/Psychiatry.

For younger populations, Grossberg recommended avoiding repetitive concussive injuries.

For middle and older populations, he recommended improving gait and balance through Thai Chi and yoga exercise.

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