In the Journals

Vyvanse may be an effective treatment for binge eating disorder

Some dosages of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate were effective in treating patients with moderate-to-severe binge eating disorder, according to data published in JAMA Psychiatry.

Susan L. McElroy, MD, of the Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE in Ohio, and colleagues conducted a safety (n=259) and intention-to-treat analysis (n=255) randomized study of adults with moderate-to-severe binge eating disorders.

Patients were randomly assigned to daily lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse, Shire) 30 mg, 50 mg, 70 mg, or placebo in a 1:1:1:1 fashion; titrated across 3 weeks, and maintained for 8 weeks.

Eleven-week data indicated that log-transformed binge eating days per week were reduced with the 50-mg (P=.008) and 70-mg daily dosage (P<.001). However, this did not apply to lower dosages (30 mg; P=.88), compared with the placebo group.

Those administered higher dosages also demonstrated greater percentages of binge eating cessation (50 mg, 42.2%; 70 mg, 50%) compared with the placebo group (21.3%).

Safety data indicated that 1.5% of patients administered lisdexamfetamine dimesylate encountered treatment-emergent adverse events, and 3.1% discontinued treatment due to these effects. One patient in the 70-mg treatment group died of toxicology findings consistent with a methamphetamine overdose, the researchers wrote.

Furthermore, patients’ mean weight in treatment groups decreased with treatment (P<.001 for each dose vs. placebo), according to data.

“Together, these findings provide substantial preliminary evidence that lisdexamfetamine may be effective for treatment of moderate-to-severe [binge eating disorder], which is consistent with its effect on [dopamine] and norepinephrine neurotransmitters and a potential effect on abnormal eating behaviors,” the researchers concluded.

Disclosure: See the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.

Some dosages of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate were effective in treating patients with moderate-to-severe binge eating disorder, according to data published in JAMA Psychiatry.

Susan L. McElroy, MD, of the Research Institute at Lindner Center of HOPE in Ohio, and colleagues conducted a safety (n=259) and intention-to-treat analysis (n=255) randomized study of adults with moderate-to-severe binge eating disorders.

Patients were randomly assigned to daily lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (Vyvanse, Shire) 30 mg, 50 mg, 70 mg, or placebo in a 1:1:1:1 fashion; titrated across 3 weeks, and maintained for 8 weeks.

Eleven-week data indicated that log-transformed binge eating days per week were reduced with the 50-mg (P=.008) and 70-mg daily dosage (P<.001). However, this did not apply to lower dosages (30 mg; P=.88), compared with the placebo group.

Those administered higher dosages also demonstrated greater percentages of binge eating cessation (50 mg, 42.2%; 70 mg, 50%) compared with the placebo group (21.3%).

Safety data indicated that 1.5% of patients administered lisdexamfetamine dimesylate encountered treatment-emergent adverse events, and 3.1% discontinued treatment due to these effects. One patient in the 70-mg treatment group died of toxicology findings consistent with a methamphetamine overdose, the researchers wrote.

Furthermore, patients’ mean weight in treatment groups decreased with treatment (P<.001 for each dose vs. placebo), according to data.

“Together, these findings provide substantial preliminary evidence that lisdexamfetamine may be effective for treatment of moderate-to-severe [binge eating disorder], which is consistent with its effect on [dopamine] and norepinephrine neurotransmitters and a potential effect on abnormal eating behaviors,” the researchers concluded.

Disclosure: See the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.