Meeting News Coverage

Prescription medication more common among individuals with binge-eating disorder

ATLANTA — Individuals with binge-eating disorder were more likely to be prescribed medication for various health issues prior to and following diagnosis, compared with healthy controls, according to data presented at the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting.

To characterize prescription medication utilization in binge-eating disorder and the role of psychiatric comorbidities and obesity, Hunna J. Watson, PhD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues conducted a Swedish register-based case-control study. Study participants were diagnosed with binge-eating disorder at specialist eating disorder clinics between 2006 and 2009 (n = 238). Ten control participants were matched with each case participant for sex, birth year, month and country (n = 2,380). Researchers assessed associations between binge-eating disorder and prescription use prior to and within 12 months after diagnosis.

Prior to diagnosis, individuals with binge-eating disorder were significantly more likely to be prescribed medications for issues related to the nervous system (OR = 6.4; 95% CI, 4.7-8.6), tumor and immune disorder (OR = 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.3), cardiovascular (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5), digestion and metabolism (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-2.9), infectious disease (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.6), skin (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.3-2.5), and respiratory system (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1-1.8), compared with controls.

Individuals with binge-eating disorder also had higher odds for prescription use 12 months following diagnosis, compared with controls.

Use of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric medication was greater among individuals with binge-eating disorder with and without comorbid obesity within 1 year of diagnosis, compared with controls.

Individuals with binge-eating disorder and comorbid obesity were significantly more likely to be prescribed anxiolytics (OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3) and skin agents (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1-5.1) within 1 year of diagnosis, compared with those with binge-eating disorder without comorbid obesity.

“The results confirm previous findings regarding the psychiatric and somatic comorbidity burden of [binge-eating disorder] and have implications for service planning,” Watson and colleagues concluded. “The findings demonstrate the need to incorporate medical management into clinical mental health care.” – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Watson H, et al. A register-based case-control study of prescription medication utilization in binge-eating disorder. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Watson reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.

ATLANTA — Individuals with binge-eating disorder were more likely to be prescribed medication for various health issues prior to and following diagnosis, compared with healthy controls, according to data presented at the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting.

To characterize prescription medication utilization in binge-eating disorder and the role of psychiatric comorbidities and obesity, Hunna J. Watson, PhD, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and colleagues conducted a Swedish register-based case-control study. Study participants were diagnosed with binge-eating disorder at specialist eating disorder clinics between 2006 and 2009 (n = 238). Ten control participants were matched with each case participant for sex, birth year, month and country (n = 2,380). Researchers assessed associations between binge-eating disorder and prescription use prior to and within 12 months after diagnosis.

Prior to diagnosis, individuals with binge-eating disorder were significantly more likely to be prescribed medications for issues related to the nervous system (OR = 6.4; 95% CI, 4.7-8.6), tumor and immune disorder (OR = 3.5; 95% CI, 1.3-9.3), cardiovascular (OR = 2.2; 95% CI, 1.4-3.5), digestion and metabolism (OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.5-2.9), infectious disease (OR = 1.9; 95% CI, 1.4-2.6), skin (OR = 1.8; 95% CI, 1.3-2.5), and respiratory system (OR = 1.3; 95% CI, 1-1.8), compared with controls.

Individuals with binge-eating disorder also had higher odds for prescription use 12 months following diagnosis, compared with controls.

Use of psychiatric and nonpsychiatric medication was greater among individuals with binge-eating disorder with and without comorbid obesity within 1 year of diagnosis, compared with controls.

Individuals with binge-eating disorder and comorbid obesity were significantly more likely to be prescribed anxiolytics (OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 1.2-5.3) and skin agents (OR = 2.3; 95% CI, 1-5.1) within 1 year of diagnosis, compared with those with binge-eating disorder without comorbid obesity.

“The results confirm previous findings regarding the psychiatric and somatic comorbidity burden of [binge-eating disorder] and have implications for service planning,” Watson and colleagues concluded. “The findings demonstrate the need to incorporate medical management into clinical mental health care.” – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Watson H, et al. A register-based case-control study of prescription medication utilization in binge-eating disorder. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Watson reports no relevant financial disclosures. Please see the study for a full list of relevant financial disclosures.

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