Meeting News Coverage

Smartphone app may improve depression treatment

ATLANTA —Mobile self-report smartphone applications may be useful in monitoring depression symptoms, as data presented here indicated depression symptoms reported on a mobile application correlated with physician-administered measurements.

“Depression severity is often monitored through clinician psychometric instruments, but interest in incorporating online and phone-based assessments is increasing as technology becomes more integrated into health care,” Anh L. Truong, MD, of Baylor College of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

To determine if mobile daily mood ratings are clinically useful to monitor and classify depression symptoms compared with standard clinician psychometric instruments, researchers had individuals with depression self-report their moods via the Smartphone and Online Usage Based Evaluation for Depression (SOLVD) application, a mobile assessment application, for 8 weeks. Patient Health Questionaire-9 (PHQ-9), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores were measured.

Analysis indicated correlations between smartphone ratings and physician-administered measurements. This correlation was stronger among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression, compared with those with mild depression.

Nidal Moukaddam, MD, PhD

Nidal Moukaddam

Correlation between average self-reported smartphone mood scores and biweekly PHQ-9 scores was 0.73 among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression and 0.36 among those with mild depression.

HAM-D scores correlated with raw mood scores among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression (0.5) and mild depression (0.003).

Correlation between HAM-A scores and self-reported smartphone scores were 0.47 among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression and 0.15 among those with mild depression.

“Smartphone data may actually be usable and useful in patients with severe depression. It may be actually very valuable to predict depression severity, even if the patient is not telling you everything as the activity element does change,” Nidal Moukaddam, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, said in a press briefing. “In the future we could certainly use it as an educational tool and as an adjunct to our information gathering for our physicians. I think it too could help with the physician-patient relationship.” – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Truong AL, et al. Preliminary findings from the smartphone and online usage-based evaluation for depression (SOLVD) study: clinical and electronic data agreement. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Psychiatry could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

ATLANTA —Mobile self-report smartphone applications may be useful in monitoring depression symptoms, as data presented here indicated depression symptoms reported on a mobile application correlated with physician-administered measurements.

“Depression severity is often monitored through clinician psychometric instruments, but interest in incorporating online and phone-based assessments is increasing as technology becomes more integrated into health care,” Anh L. Truong, MD, of Baylor College of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

To determine if mobile daily mood ratings are clinically useful to monitor and classify depression symptoms compared with standard clinician psychometric instruments, researchers had individuals with depression self-report their moods via the Smartphone and Online Usage Based Evaluation for Depression (SOLVD) application, a mobile assessment application, for 8 weeks. Patient Health Questionaire-9 (PHQ-9), Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) scores were measured.

Analysis indicated correlations between smartphone ratings and physician-administered measurements. This correlation was stronger among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression, compared with those with mild depression.

Nidal Moukaddam, MD, PhD

Nidal Moukaddam

Correlation between average self-reported smartphone mood scores and biweekly PHQ-9 scores was 0.73 among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression and 0.36 among those with mild depression.

HAM-D scores correlated with raw mood scores among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression (0.5) and mild depression (0.003).

Correlation between HAM-A scores and self-reported smartphone scores were 0.47 among individuals with moderate-to-severe depression and 0.15 among those with mild depression.

“Smartphone data may actually be usable and useful in patients with severe depression. It may be actually very valuable to predict depression severity, even if the patient is not telling you everything as the activity element does change,” Nidal Moukaddam, MD, PhD, of Baylor College of Medicine, said in a press briefing. “In the future we could certainly use it as an educational tool and as an adjunct to our information gathering for our physicians. I think it too could help with the physician-patient relationship.” – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Truong AL, et al. Preliminary findings from the smartphone and online usage-based evaluation for depression (SOLVD) study: clinical and electronic data agreement. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Psychiatry could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

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