Meeting News Coverage

Study shows racial/ethnic disparities in mental health care utilization

ATLANTA — Depression-related hospitalizations have steadily increased in the United States and significant racial/ethnic disparities in utilization of mental health care exist, according to data presented at the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting.

To determine trends of depression-related hospitalizations in the United States, Ankur Patel, MD, of Penn State College of Medicine, and colleagues analyzed National Inpatient Sample data for hospitalizations with a primary diagnosis of major depression from 2008 to 2012.

During the study period, 39,073,390 hospitalizations occurred. Of these, 465,434 were primarily categorized as related to major depression.

White individuals had the highest number of depression-related hospitalizations, while Asian/Pacific Islander and Native American individuals had the lowest.

Age, payer, hospital division and zip-income were significant predictors of length of stay and total hospital charges per admission.

Hispanics and Asians/Pacific Islanders had higher hospital charges per admission, while Native Americans had lower hospital charges per admission, compared with whites and blacks.

“To conclude my findings, depression-related hospitalizations have shown a steady upward incline over the years, and racial/ethnic and economic disparities in utilization of mental health services are significant and concerning,” Patel said in a press briefing. – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Patel A, et al. Trends in depression-related hospitalizations in the United States from 2008 to 2012. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Psychiatry could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

ATLANTA — Depression-related hospitalizations have steadily increased in the United States and significant racial/ethnic disparities in utilization of mental health care exist, according to data presented at the American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting.

To determine trends of depression-related hospitalizations in the United States, Ankur Patel, MD, of Penn State College of Medicine, and colleagues analyzed National Inpatient Sample data for hospitalizations with a primary diagnosis of major depression from 2008 to 2012.

During the study period, 39,073,390 hospitalizations occurred. Of these, 465,434 were primarily categorized as related to major depression.

White individuals had the highest number of depression-related hospitalizations, while Asian/Pacific Islander and Native American individuals had the lowest.

Age, payer, hospital division and zip-income were significant predictors of length of stay and total hospital charges per admission.

Hispanics and Asians/Pacific Islanders had higher hospital charges per admission, while Native Americans had lower hospital charges per admission, compared with whites and blacks.

“To conclude my findings, depression-related hospitalizations have shown a steady upward incline over the years, and racial/ethnic and economic disparities in utilization of mental health services are significant and concerning,” Patel said in a press briefing. – by Amanda Oldt

Reference:

Patel A, et al. Trends in depression-related hospitalizations in the United States from 2008 to 2012. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting; May 14-18, 2016; Atlanta.

Disclosure: Healio.com/Psychiatry could not confirm relevant financial disclosures at the time of publication.

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