Meeting News Coverage

CBT by email appears effective for treating anxiety

SAN FRANCISCO — Treatment for general anxiety disorder, administered by email, appears effective, according to data presented here.

During a poster session, Nazanin Alavi, a psychiatry resident at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, presented results from her study of 61 patients aged 20 to 40 years who had been diagnosed with but were not undergoing treatment for general anxiety disorder. The diagnosis was made via an online assessment.

Thirty-one of the patients in the group received 12 email-based cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions; the remainder of the group served as a control, receiving no treatment. At 6- and 12-month follow-up, the patients in the group who received the therapy by email reported significant improvement in their anxiety symptoms when compared with controls.

In a news briefing, Alavi said the findings had important implications for overcoming barriers to mental health care such as increased wait times in large urban areas, lack of access to professional mental health care in rural areas, and language and cultural barriers faced by immigrants.

For more information:

Alavi N. Poster NR720. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association 166th Annual Meeting; May 18-22, 2013; San Francisco.

Disclosure: Alavi reports no relevant financial disclosures.

SAN FRANCISCO — Treatment for general anxiety disorder, administered by email, appears effective, according to data presented here.

During a poster session, Nazanin Alavi, a psychiatry resident at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, presented results from her study of 61 patients aged 20 to 40 years who had been diagnosed with but were not undergoing treatment for general anxiety disorder. The diagnosis was made via an online assessment.

Thirty-one of the patients in the group received 12 email-based cognitive-behavioral therapy sessions; the remainder of the group served as a control, receiving no treatment. At 6- and 12-month follow-up, the patients in the group who received the therapy by email reported significant improvement in their anxiety symptoms when compared with controls.

In a news briefing, Alavi said the findings had important implications for overcoming barriers to mental health care such as increased wait times in large urban areas, lack of access to professional mental health care in rural areas, and language and cultural barriers faced by immigrants.

For more information:

Alavi N. Poster NR720. Presented at: American Psychiatric Association 166th Annual Meeting; May 18-22, 2013; San Francisco.

Disclosure: Alavi reports no relevant financial disclosures.

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