Top hematology/oncology stories: Focused ultrasound could transform glioblastoma treatment, app helps identify melanoma

This week, the most-read story in hematology/oncology was a Healio exclusive regarding how MRI-guided focused ultrasound for opening the blood-brain barrier may transform the treatment delivery of glioblastoma.

Other top stories included a Tinder-style app that helps medical students identify melanoma, the FDA granting Lynparza orphan drug designation for pancreatic cancer and Imbruvica-Gazyva combination priority review for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and trial findings that antibody-drug conjugate reduced the recurrence of HER2-positive early breast cancer.

Focused ultrasound to open blood-brain barrier could transform glioblastoma treatment delivery

A pivotal trial is underway at University of Maryland Medical Center to evaluate the safety of MRI-guided focused ultrasound for opening the blood-brain barrier in patients undergoing surgery for glioblastoma. Read more.

Tinder-style app helps medical students identify melanoma

A smartphone app may help medical students more accurately differentiate melanomas from benign skin lesions, according to study results published in JAMA Dermatology. Read more.

FDA grants Lynparza orphan drug designation for pancreatic cancer

The FDA granted orphan drug designation to olaparib for the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer, according to the agent’s manufacturer. Read more.

Imbruvica-Gazyva combination receives priority review for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

The FDA granted priority review to ibrutinib in combination with obinutuzumab for the treatment of previously untreated adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Read more.

Antibody-drug conjugate reduces recurrence of HER2-positive early breast cancer

A randomized phase 3 trial of trastuzumab emtansine met its primary endpoint of reducing risk for disease recurrence or death compared with trastuzumab among adults with HER2-positive early breast cancer with residual disease following neoadjuvant treatment, according to the manufacturer. Read more.

 

 

This week, the most-read story in hematology/oncology was a Healio exclusive regarding how MRI-guided focused ultrasound for opening the blood-brain barrier may transform the treatment delivery of glioblastoma.

Other top stories included a Tinder-style app that helps medical students identify melanoma, the FDA granting Lynparza orphan drug designation for pancreatic cancer and Imbruvica-Gazyva combination priority review for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and trial findings that antibody-drug conjugate reduced the recurrence of HER2-positive early breast cancer.

Focused ultrasound to open blood-brain barrier could transform glioblastoma treatment delivery

A pivotal trial is underway at University of Maryland Medical Center to evaluate the safety of MRI-guided focused ultrasound for opening the blood-brain barrier in patients undergoing surgery for glioblastoma. Read more.

Tinder-style app helps medical students identify melanoma

A smartphone app may help medical students more accurately differentiate melanomas from benign skin lesions, according to study results published in JAMA Dermatology. Read more.

FDA grants Lynparza orphan drug designation for pancreatic cancer

The FDA granted orphan drug designation to olaparib for the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer, according to the agent’s manufacturer. Read more.

Imbruvica-Gazyva combination receives priority review for chronic lymphocytic leukemia

The FDA granted priority review to ibrutinib in combination with obinutuzumab for the treatment of previously untreated adults with chronic lymphocytic leukemia or small lymphocytic lymphoma. Read more.

Antibody-drug conjugate reduces recurrence of HER2-positive early breast cancer

A randomized phase 3 trial of trastuzumab emtansine met its primary endpoint of reducing risk for disease recurrence or death compared with trastuzumab among adults with HER2-positive early breast cancer with residual disease following neoadjuvant treatment, according to the manufacturer. Read more.