Cannabinoids may not reduce cancer pain, gut bacteria possibly linked to colorectal cancer spike — top stories in hematology/oncology

Researchers found that cannabinoids did not appear to reduce cancer-related pain in adults. It was the week’s top story in hematology/oncology.

Another top story included results from an ongoing study that showed gut bacteria may be partially responsible for the spike in colorectal cancer cases among adults aged younger than 45 years.

Cannabinoids ineffective for cancer pain

Cannabinoids did not appear to reduce cancer-associated pain among adults with cancer, according to results of a systemic review and meta-analysis published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. Read more.

Gut bacteria may be factor in rising colorectal cancer incidence among younger adults

Fusobacterium nucleatum may be partially responsible for the sharp increase in colorectal cancer incidence among individuals aged younger than 45 years, according to preliminary results of an ongoing study presented at Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Read more.

Smoking 
Low-dose CT screening linked to reduced lung cancer mortality among current, former smokers.
Source: Shutterstock

Actinium partners with UC Davis on gene therapy for HIV-related lymphoma

Actinium Pharmaceuticals has forged an agreement with University of California, Davis for the use of its proprietary CD45 antibody radiation-conjugate, apamistamab-I-131, in the institution’s ongoing phase 1/phase 2 clinical trial of stem cell gene therapy for patients with HIV-related lymphoma. Read more.

Low-dose CT screening linked to reduced lung cancer mortality among current, former smokers

Low-dose, volume-based CT screening appeared to be associated with reduced lung cancer mortality compared with no screening among individuals at high risk for the disease, according to results of the randomized NELSON trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Read more.

Few patients enroll in cancer clinical trials as first line of treatment

An “exceedingly low” percentage of patients with cancer enroll in clinical trials as the first course of therapy, according to results of a study conducted at Penn State College of Medicine and published in Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Read more.

Researchers found that cannabinoids did not appear to reduce cancer-related pain in adults. It was the week’s top story in hematology/oncology.

Another top story included results from an ongoing study that showed gut bacteria may be partially responsible for the spike in colorectal cancer cases among adults aged younger than 45 years.

Cannabinoids ineffective for cancer pain

Cannabinoids did not appear to reduce cancer-associated pain among adults with cancer, according to results of a systemic review and meta-analysis published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care. Read more.

Gut bacteria may be factor in rising colorectal cancer incidence among younger adults

Fusobacterium nucleatum may be partially responsible for the sharp increase in colorectal cancer incidence among individuals aged younger than 45 years, according to preliminary results of an ongoing study presented at Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium. Read more.

Smoking 
Low-dose CT screening linked to reduced lung cancer mortality among current, former smokers.
Source: Shutterstock

Actinium partners with UC Davis on gene therapy for HIV-related lymphoma

Actinium Pharmaceuticals has forged an agreement with University of California, Davis for the use of its proprietary CD45 antibody radiation-conjugate, apamistamab-I-131, in the institution’s ongoing phase 1/phase 2 clinical trial of stem cell gene therapy for patients with HIV-related lymphoma. Read more.

Low-dose CT screening linked to reduced lung cancer mortality among current, former smokers

Low-dose, volume-based CT screening appeared to be associated with reduced lung cancer mortality compared with no screening among individuals at high risk for the disease, according to results of the randomized NELSON trial published in The New England Journal of Medicine. Read more.

Few patients enroll in cancer clinical trials as first line of treatment

An “exceedingly low” percentage of patients with cancer enroll in clinical trials as the first course of therapy, according to results of a study conducted at Penn State College of Medicine and published in Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network. Read more.