In the Journals

Soft drinks tied to risk for death

Consuming more soft drinks — both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened — increases the risk for all-cause mortality, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Reformulation of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, in which sugar is replaced with low-or no-calorie sweeteners, is being driven by consumer awareness and fiscal instruments, such as taxes,” Amy Mullee, PhD, lecturer and assistant professor in the School of Agriculture and Food Science at University College Dublin, and colleagues wrote. “Artificially sweetened soft drinks have few or no calories; however, their long-term physiological and health implications are largely unknown.”

To evaluate the effects of soft drink consumption on mortality, researchers conducted a population-based cohort study of participants from 10 European countries.

Members of the cohort were enrolled from Jan. 1, 1992, to Dec. 31, 2000, and were followed up between December 2008 and December 2013. They reported the total number of soft drinks, and number of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks, consumed per month, week or day through self-administered questionnaires.

Soft Drink Being Poured Into Glass 
Consuming more soft drinks — both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened — increases the risk for all-cause mortality, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Source: Adobe Stock

The cohort included 451,743 participants with a mean age of 50.8 years. The mean follow-up for participants was 16.4 years, during which time 41,693 died.

Compared with those who drank less than one soft drink each month, all-cause mortality was higher among participants who drank two or more per day of total soft drinks (HR = 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16), or artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.35).

Deaths from circulatory diseases were higher among those who drank two glasses of artificially sweetened soft drinks each day compared with those who consumed less than one glass per month (HR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.3-1.78).

Drinking at least one glass of sugar-sweetened soft drink each day was associated with a higher risk for death from digestive diseases compared with drinking less than one glass each month (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.05).

“The results of this study are supportive of ongoing public health campaigns aimed at reducing the consumption of soft drinks,” Mullee and colleagues wrote. – by Erin Michael

Disclosures: Mullee reported receiving grants from International Agency for Research on Cancer and University College Dublin during the conduct of the study. Please see study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

Consuming more soft drinks — both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened — increases the risk for all-cause mortality, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Reformulation of sugar-sweetened soft drinks, in which sugar is replaced with low-or no-calorie sweeteners, is being driven by consumer awareness and fiscal instruments, such as taxes,” Amy Mullee, PhD, lecturer and assistant professor in the School of Agriculture and Food Science at University College Dublin, and colleagues wrote. “Artificially sweetened soft drinks have few or no calories; however, their long-term physiological and health implications are largely unknown.”

To evaluate the effects of soft drink consumption on mortality, researchers conducted a population-based cohort study of participants from 10 European countries.

Members of the cohort were enrolled from Jan. 1, 1992, to Dec. 31, 2000, and were followed up between December 2008 and December 2013. They reported the total number of soft drinks, and number of sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened soft drinks, consumed per month, week or day through self-administered questionnaires.

Soft Drink Being Poured Into Glass 
Consuming more soft drinks — both sugar-sweetened and artificially sweetened — increases the risk for all-cause mortality, according to a study published in JAMA Internal Medicine.
Source: Adobe Stock

The cohort included 451,743 participants with a mean age of 50.8 years. The mean follow-up for participants was 16.4 years, during which time 41,693 died.

Compared with those who drank less than one soft drink each month, all-cause mortality was higher among participants who drank two or more per day of total soft drinks (HR = 1.17; 95% CI, 1.11-1.22), sugar-sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.01-1.16), or artificially sweetened soft drinks (HR = 1.26; 95% CI, 1.16-1.35).

Deaths from circulatory diseases were higher among those who drank two glasses of artificially sweetened soft drinks each day compared with those who consumed less than one glass per month (HR = 1.52; 95% CI, 1.3-1.78).

Drinking at least one glass of sugar-sweetened soft drink each day was associated with a higher risk for death from digestive diseases compared with drinking less than one glass each month (HR = 1.59; 95% CI, 1.24-2.05).

“The results of this study are supportive of ongoing public health campaigns aimed at reducing the consumption of soft drinks,” Mullee and colleagues wrote. – by Erin Michael

Disclosures: Mullee reported receiving grants from International Agency for Research on Cancer and University College Dublin during the conduct of the study. Please see study for all other authors’ relevant financial disclosures.

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