Chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease: What primary care physicians need to know

According to the National Kidney Foundation, chronic kidney disease affects approximately 26 million people in the United States and is responsible for more deaths than prostate cancer or breast cancer. Although many of those with chronic kidney disease do not know they have the condition, it is responsible for $100 billion in Medicare costs annually. End-stage renal disease, another significant kidney condition with significant morbidity, is present in approximately 675,000 Americans.

In recognition of National Kidney Month, Healio Family Medicine has compiled some of the latest research into chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Here is what you need to know:

Sickle cell gene linked to increased risk for end-stage renal disease

Patients who carry the sickle cell trait were linked to a twofold increase in developing end-stage renal disease as opposed to noncarriers, according to research published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Read more

Intensive BP control does not benefit kidney disease progression

Targeting BP below the current standard did not provide better renoprotection in patients with chronic kidney disease without diabetes, but nonblack patients and those with a higher level of proteinuria may benefit from intensive BP-lowering treatments, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Read more

Lower soci oeconomic status linked to end- stage renal disease development in type 1 diabetes

Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop end-stage renal disease if their parents completed 12 or fewer years of education or received income support, according to findings from a longitudinal, register-based study in Sweden. Read more

PPIs linked to kidney function decline even in patients with no kidney problems

The use of proton pump inhibitors may cause serious kidney problems that can go undetected for some time, according to research that appeared in Kidney International. Read more

Lack of sleep may increase progression of kidney disease

The longer a patient with chronic kidney disease slept, the lower that patient’s risk for end-stage renal disease, according to findings presented at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week. Read more

Chronic kidney disease risk tied to diabetes, overweight, obesity in Asian adults

Diabetes plus overweight or obesity increases the risk for chronic kidney disease among Asian adults, according to findings of a longitudinal study from Taiwan. Read more

According to the National Kidney Foundation, chronic kidney disease affects approximately 26 million people in the United States and is responsible for more deaths than prostate cancer or breast cancer. Although many of those with chronic kidney disease do not know they have the condition, it is responsible for $100 billion in Medicare costs annually. End-stage renal disease, another significant kidney condition with significant morbidity, is present in approximately 675,000 Americans.

In recognition of National Kidney Month, Healio Family Medicine has compiled some of the latest research into chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. Here is what you need to know:

Sickle cell gene linked to increased risk for end-stage renal disease

Patients who carry the sickle cell trait were linked to a twofold increase in developing end-stage renal disease as opposed to noncarriers, according to research published in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. Read more

Intensive BP control does not benefit kidney disease progression

Targeting BP below the current standard did not provide better renoprotection in patients with chronic kidney disease without diabetes, but nonblack patients and those with a higher level of proteinuria may benefit from intensive BP-lowering treatments, according to research published in JAMA Internal Medicine. Read more

Lower soci oeconomic status linked to end- stage renal disease development in type 1 diabetes

Patients with type 1 diabetes are more likely to develop end-stage renal disease if their parents completed 12 or fewer years of education or received income support, according to findings from a longitudinal, register-based study in Sweden. Read more

PPIs linked to kidney function decline even in patients with no kidney problems

The use of proton pump inhibitors may cause serious kidney problems that can go undetected for some time, according to research that appeared in Kidney International. Read more

Lack of sleep may increase progression of kidney disease

The longer a patient with chronic kidney disease slept, the lower that patient’s risk for end-stage renal disease, according to findings presented at the American Society of Nephrology Kidney Week. Read more

Chronic kidney disease risk tied to diabetes, overweight, obesity in Asian adults

Diabetes plus overweight or obesity increases the risk for chronic kidney disease among Asian adults, according to findings of a longitudinal study from Taiwan. Read more

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