Meeting News

Mental health needs may go unaddressed in pregnant women

NASHVILLE — The mental health needs of pregnant women are not always addressed by the medical community, according to data presented at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting.

“Postpartum depression is a recognized public health issue. ... However, less is known about antepartum depression in women, especially those hospitalized during their pregnancies,” Alexandra I. Goodwin, a MD candidate at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

Researchers reviewed Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale from 93 pregnant women upon their hospitalization and after 6 weeks.

They found that 33% had a positive score on admission, and that the mother’s number of living children was among the reasons for higher scores. Goodwin and colleagues also found among the women studied, 49 had follow-up data available, with 20% reporting positive scores. Admission to the neonatal ICU and previous hospitalization were associated with higher scale scores.

“There are many unmet needs for women during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. It is therefore imperative that we include depression screening as a routine part of admission for high risk pregnancies,” Goodwin and colleagues wrote.

“Additionally, by identifying certain factors that may prevent or predispose women to depression, we can better screen patients who may benefit from increased psychosocial support surrounding their pregnancy.” – by Janel Miller

Reference: Goodwin, AI. “Risk factors for the development of antepartum and postpartum depression in patients hospitalized during pregnancy.” Presented at: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting; May 3-6, 2019; Nashville.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

 

NASHVILLE — The mental health needs of pregnant women are not always addressed by the medical community, according to data presented at the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting.

“Postpartum depression is a recognized public health issue. ... However, less is known about antepartum depression in women, especially those hospitalized during their pregnancies,” Alexandra I. Goodwin, a MD candidate at the Wake Forest University School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote.

Researchers reviewed Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale from 93 pregnant women upon their hospitalization and after 6 weeks.

They found that 33% had a positive score on admission, and that the mother’s number of living children was among the reasons for higher scores. Goodwin and colleagues also found among the women studied, 49 had follow-up data available, with 20% reporting positive scores. Admission to the neonatal ICU and previous hospitalization were associated with higher scale scores.

“There are many unmet needs for women during pregnancy and in the postpartum period. It is therefore imperative that we include depression screening as a routine part of admission for high risk pregnancies,” Goodwin and colleagues wrote.

“Additionally, by identifying certain factors that may prevent or predispose women to depression, we can better screen patients who may benefit from increased psychosocial support surrounding their pregnancy.” – by Janel Miller

Reference: Goodwin, AI. “Risk factors for the development of antepartum and postpartum depression in patients hospitalized during pregnancy.” Presented at: American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Annual Clinical and Scientific Meeting; May 3-6, 2019; Nashville.

Disclosures: The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

 

 

 

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