ACOG releases updated committee opinion on LARC recommendations

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has strengthened their recommendation that long-acting reversible contraceptives are the most effective and safest form of reversible contraceptive. 

“ACOG has long recommended [long-acting reversible contraceptives] as the most effective reversible contraceptive option for most women, including those who have not given birth and adolescents who are sexually active. We continually see more and more data to support and strengthen our recommendations at the same time that more [long-acting reversible contraception] options are becoming available,” David E. Soper, MD, chair of ACOG’s Gynecologic Practice Committee, said in a press release.

To reduce barriers and increase access to long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), ACOG recommends that individual obstetricians-gynecologists:

  • Provide counseling on all available contraceptive options, including LARC, to women at risk for unintended pregnancies.
  • Provide encouragement for LARC consideration to appropriate candidates, including sexually active adolescents and nulliparous women.
  • Adopt best practices for LARC insertion and become familiar with changes in practice guidelines.
  • Advocate for insurance coverage of all contraceptive methods, as well as appropriate payment and reimbursement methods for every contraceptive method.
  • Become familiar with and provide support for local, state, federal and private programs that would make all contraceptive methods more affordable.

“All women should have access to safe contraceptive methods, including LARCs. By familiarizing themselves with local, state (including Medicaid), federal and private programs that improve affordability of all contraceptive methods, OB-GYNs can support access to LARC in all clinically appropriate circumstances. We continue to urge OB-GYNs to become familiar with LARC methods and to incorporate LARC counseling and insertion into their practices,” Eve Espey, MD, MPH, chair of ACOG’s LARC Working Group, said in a press release. – by Casey Hower

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists has strengthened their recommendation that long-acting reversible contraceptives are the most effective and safest form of reversible contraceptive. 

“ACOG has long recommended [long-acting reversible contraceptives] as the most effective reversible contraceptive option for most women, including those who have not given birth and adolescents who are sexually active. We continually see more and more data to support and strengthen our recommendations at the same time that more [long-acting reversible contraception] options are becoming available,” David E. Soper, MD, chair of ACOG’s Gynecologic Practice Committee, said in a press release.

To reduce barriers and increase access to long-acting reversible contraception (LARC), ACOG recommends that individual obstetricians-gynecologists:

  • Provide counseling on all available contraceptive options, including LARC, to women at risk for unintended pregnancies.
  • Provide encouragement for LARC consideration to appropriate candidates, including sexually active adolescents and nulliparous women.
  • Adopt best practices for LARC insertion and become familiar with changes in practice guidelines.
  • Advocate for insurance coverage of all contraceptive methods, as well as appropriate payment and reimbursement methods for every contraceptive method.
  • Become familiar with and provide support for local, state, federal and private programs that would make all contraceptive methods more affordable.

“All women should have access to safe contraceptive methods, including LARCs. By familiarizing themselves with local, state (including Medicaid), federal and private programs that improve affordability of all contraceptive methods, OB-GYNs can support access to LARC in all clinically appropriate circumstances. We continue to urge OB-GYNs to become familiar with LARC methods and to incorporate LARC counseling and insertion into their practices,” Eve Espey, MD, MPH, chair of ACOG’s LARC Working Group, said in a press release. – by Casey Hower