Latest dementia research for physicians

Researchers estimated that the prevalence of dementia was 13.9% among people in the United States aged 71 years and older, according to a report in Neuroepidemiology. They also reported that prevalence will increase as the elderly population increases, making treatment and prevention of dementia vital.

Healio.com/Internal Medicine presents the latest dementia research, including a new test for primary care physicians, risk factors and cost.

New test predicts dementia during routine family doctor visits

Information collected during routine primary care visits can be used to predict 5-year risk for dementia in patients aged 60 to 79 years, but not those 80 and older, according to data published in BMC Medicine. Read more.

Dementia incidence decreases over time among Framingham Heart Study participants

Incidence of dementia significantly decreased over time among participants in the Framingham Heart Study, according to recent findings. Read more.

Dementia risk increases with type 2 diabetes

There is a 60% greater risk for dementia in men and women with type 2 diabetes compared with those without diabetes. The additional risk for vascular dementia was greater in women, according to researchers. Read more.

Chronic stress, anxiety may increase risk for depression, dementia

Chronic stress and anxiety may increase risk for depression and dementia, according to a review in Current Opinion Psychiatry. Read more.

Cost of dementia 57% greater than other diseases in final years of life

Compared with costs associated with heart disease, cancer or other causes, patients with dementia face the largest health care expenditures, totaling more than $287,000 in the last 5 years of life, according to recently published data. Read more.

PPIs may increase risk for dementia

Regular use of proton pump inhibitors was found to be associated with an increased risk for incident dementia in older patients, according to results from a prospective cohort study. Read more.

Dementia incidence varies more than 60% between ethnicities

Dementia incidence varied more than 60% between racial/ethnic groups, and was highest among blacks and lowest among Asian Americans, according to recent findings. Read more.

Reference:

Plassman, BL et al. Neuroepidemiology. 2007;doi:10.1159/000109998.

Researchers estimated that the prevalence of dementia was 13.9% among people in the United States aged 71 years and older, according to a report in Neuroepidemiology. They also reported that prevalence will increase as the elderly population increases, making treatment and prevention of dementia vital.

Healio.com/Internal Medicine presents the latest dementia research, including a new test for primary care physicians, risk factors and cost.

New test predicts dementia during routine family doctor visits

Information collected during routine primary care visits can be used to predict 5-year risk for dementia in patients aged 60 to 79 years, but not those 80 and older, according to data published in BMC Medicine. Read more.

Dementia incidence decreases over time among Framingham Heart Study participants

Incidence of dementia significantly decreased over time among participants in the Framingham Heart Study, according to recent findings. Read more.

Dementia risk increases with type 2 diabetes

There is a 60% greater risk for dementia in men and women with type 2 diabetes compared with those without diabetes. The additional risk for vascular dementia was greater in women, according to researchers. Read more.

Chronic stress, anxiety may increase risk for depression, dementia

Chronic stress and anxiety may increase risk for depression and dementia, according to a review in Current Opinion Psychiatry. Read more.

Cost of dementia 57% greater than other diseases in final years of life

Compared with costs associated with heart disease, cancer or other causes, patients with dementia face the largest health care expenditures, totaling more than $287,000 in the last 5 years of life, according to recently published data. Read more.

PPIs may increase risk for dementia

Regular use of proton pump inhibitors was found to be associated with an increased risk for incident dementia in older patients, according to results from a prospective cohort study. Read more.

Dementia incidence varies more than 60% between ethnicities

Dementia incidence varied more than 60% between racial/ethnic groups, and was highest among blacks and lowest among Asian Americans, according to recent findings. Read more.

Reference:

Plassman, BL et al. Neuroepidemiology. 2007;doi:10.1159/000109998.